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  1. #1
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    Default Model 1892 in 25.20 cal.

    Looking for some info on this Winchester Model 1892 in 25-20 WCF. Based upon the serial number, 841204 does anyone know when it was made? This rifle has is a fairly small caliber, does it have a market? It has a 20 inch round barrel.

    Any help would be appreciated.

    Joe
    Last edited by Gercolctor; 07-06-2008 at 08:36 PM.

  2. #2
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    There is a pop up peep sight behind the hammer. Was this original? The rear barrel sight has been removed.

  3. #3
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    I am no expert but that looks like a Short Rifle.
    .44-40 WCF. IS THE MOST POPULAR WITH 1892 COLLECTORS THEN
    .38-40 WCF.
    .32-20 WCF.
    .25-20 WCF.
    NOT SURE IF THE 92 CAME OUT IN .218 BEE, OR THE MOD. 53 OR THE MOD. 65 LEAVER GUNS.
    I can not help much with the s/# but i think about 1917.
    Where's Burt Hartman when you need him :-)
    Cheers chester.

  4. #4
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    You know all the words and you sing all the notes but you never quite learned the song.
    I can tell by the sadness in your eyes, that you never quite learned the song.

  5. #5
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    The round is a nice little groundhog and varmint killer but not in modern sense (not flat shooting). It will take out a groundhog or coyote nicely though.

  6. #6
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    reddog

    Thank you for the info. Never seen a 25-20 before and was not sure exactly what was the purpose of this caliber.

    Chester & Ben Gunn, I appreciate the manufacturer's date and the Winchester info web site.

  7. #7

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    I have one that has a hex barrel. Is it worth more than the round?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by enterprisecvn View Post
    I have one that has a hex barrel. Is it worth more than the round?
    Hex barrel or hex reciever cuz my mosin has a hex receiver and made in 1925


  9. #9
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    exter

    The hex barrels on the model 1892 are considered by some folks to be more desirable then the round ones.

    Joe

  10. #10
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    Especially since they (hex - six-sided - barrels) are not a cataloged option, meaning that if one (hex barrel) can be documented as coming from the factory special order, it would be VERY desirable.

    On the other hand, if you have an OCTAGON (eight-sided), they are a catalog option, and while most people like them more than round ones, they aren't quite as desirable as the often mentioned but seldom seen (never on a Winchester in my experience) hex-barrels.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  11. #11
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    The Hex barrel seems common to the Model 92, at least from what I've seen in .25-20.

    I grew up with my Dad's model 92 .25-20. Even in the 60's the round was considered obsolete, although a few years ago there was a brief resurgence in rifles chambered for it - Ruger, I think, was one.

    My Grandfather was a Detroit Schoolteacher, who taught additional night classes in math, drafting, foundry & woodworking for local businessmen. He also taught a few classes on building split bamboo flyrods. My Dad still owns one.

    One student was a gunshop owner who suddenly fell into a cash shortage. In lieu of monetary payment, he invited Grandpa to visit the gunshop to select something he liked. Not sure what Grandpa ended up with, but my 9 year-old Dad had his eye on the Model 92 ... or an Enfield.

    Grandpa recommended the Enfield, since you could hunt with it, but Dad only saw "Cowboy Gun". An so today, 72 years later, the Winchester resides in its' canvas & leather case in the guestroom closet of my Parent's house.

    I grew up with the .25-20, and it was responsible for starting me out on my reloading career. In fact, I still have the .25-20 LeeLoader, and the modified bottlecapper I used as a press (instead of the hammer) ... but I still have the yellow plastic hammer I started out with, too

    .25-20 is ok for Woodchuck, gophers & prairie dogs, but then again, so is almost every other small centerfire ctg.

    Dad still has some of the ammo I reloaded in the 70's, and someday I may take it out plinking again. It was the first & only levergun I'd handled until just a few years ago, when I
    got a model 94 16" Ranger in .357 Mag. for the local Deer.

    I've seen comparable rifles tagged & sold at $700 at local gun shows.

  12. #12
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    The Hex barrel seems common to the Model 92, at least from what I've seen in .25-20.

    I grew up with my Dad's model 92 .25-20. Even in the 60's the round was considered obsolete, although a few years ago there was a brief resurgence in rifles chambered for it - Ruger, I think, was one.

    My Grandfather was a Detroit Schoolteacher, who taught additional night classes in math, drafting, foundry & woodworking for local businessmen. He also taught a few classes on building split bamboo flyrods. My Dad still owns one.

    One student was a gunshop owner who suddenly fell into a cash shortage. In lieu of monetary payment, he invited Grandpa to visit the gunshop to select something he liked. Not sure what Grandpa ended up with, but my 9 year-old Dad had his eye on the Model 92 ... or an Enfield.

    Grandpa recommended the /Enfield, since you could hunt with it, but Dad only saw "Cowboy Gun". An so today, 72 years later, the Winchester residxes in its' canvas & leather case in the guestroom closet of my Parent's house.

    I grew up with the .25-20, and it was responsible for starting me out on my reloading career. In fact, I still have the .25-20 LeeLoader, and tghe modified bottlecapper I used as a press (instead of he hammer) ... but I still have the yellow plastic hammer I started out with, too:D

    .25-20 is ok for Woodchuck & prairie dogs, but then again, so is almost every other small centerfire ctg.

    Dad still has some of the ammo I reloaded in the 70's, and someday I may take it out plinking again. It was the first & only levergun I'd handled until just a few years ago, when I
    got a model 94 16" Ranger in .357 Mag. for the local Deer.

    I've seen comparable rifles for $700 at local gun shows.

  13. #13
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    Thumbs up A great little round.

    I have two 1892's in .25-20, one octagonal and one round barrels and i have no proof but i think it was Burt Hartman that said the round barrel was less common.
    The .25-20 was very popular down here on the Kangaroo's and any other smaller critters.
    I dont own a chrony but i have played around with some hot loads and if you use hard magnum primers they wont flatten.
    That action will handle the hottest loads you can give it but the thin shells wont last long.
    Many years back there was a gun writer down here (Colin Shadbolt) that wildcatted it about like the .22K Hornet and he was claiming speeds at around 2900 fps with the 86G. pill.
    I dont know how he came up with that speed as there was no chrony's around here then. The military here may have had some primitive type though.
    Now you have me wanting to go digging thrue my dusty old magazines to re-read some of his story's AZshooter :-) Cheers chester.

  14. #14
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    Default Mod. 92's

    AZshooter-I'd be buying all the 92's for $700 I could find unless they're wothless relics. Someone has already commented that the term for the barrel(s) is "octagon" so I'd add just one more suggestion: Take the 92 out of the canvas and leather case in the closet. Even in the arid AZ climate a case like that is a moisture trap; at some point you're liable to find that nice 92 resplendent with a very nice red rust color. -Asa

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by chester. View Post
    I have two 1892's in .25-20, one octagonal and one round barrels and i have no proof but i think it was Burt Hartman that said the round barrel was less common.
    The .25-20 was very popular down here on the Kangaroo's and any other smaller critters.
    I dont own a chrony but i have played around with some hot loads and if you use hard magnum primers they wont flatten.
    That action will handle the hottest loads you can give it but the thin shells wont last long.
    Many years back there was a gun writer down here (Colin Shadbolt) that wildcatted it about like the .22K Hornet and he was claiming speeds at around 2900 fps with the 86G. pill.
    I dont know how he came up with that speed as there was no chrony's around here then. The military here may have had some primitive type though.
    Now you have me wanting to go digging thrue my dusty old magazines to re-read some of his story's AZshooter :-) Cheers chester.
    You can take a 25-20 and run a Mashburn Bee reamer in and - you won't get enough case capacity short of loading it with PETN or Comp C to get 2900 fps. Heck - you can't get 2900 fps with an 86 grain bullet in a 256 Win Mag which has a LOT more case capacity than is possible with a 25-20.


    Fastest load I find for 256 Mag is 2800 fps, with a 60 (not 86) grain bullet and 16 grains of H-4227. Best 87 grain is 2200 fps and 14 grains of H (or IMR)-4227. Best 25-20 is 2250 with a 60 grain, and around 1700 with an 86. I expect if you did the Mashburn thing to improve the case, you could get 100-150 fps extra with the 60 grain and 75-125 fps extra with the 86.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  16. #16
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    Checked case capacities.

    256 Win Mag - 20.49 grains water

    25-20 WCF - 18.85 grains water

    218 Mashburn Bee - 19.12 grains water

    256 doesn't hold as much more than a 25-20 as I'd have guessed, and i rather expect that an "Improved" 25-20 would have pretty much the same capacity as a 218 Mashburn Bee, which still is 1.37 grains of water less than what a factory 256 will hold. Data from HANDLOADERS HANDBOOK OF CARTRIDGE CONVERSIONS.

    While a 92 (essentially a miniaturized 1886) is pretty stout, I wouldn't care to load one to the pressures common in and normal for 256 WM.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Checked case capacities.

    256 Win Mag - 20.49 grains water

    25-20 WCF - 18.85 grains water

    218 Mashburn Bee - 19.12 grains water

    256 doesn't hold as much more than a 25-20 as I'd have guessed, and i rather expect that an "Improved" 25-20 would have pretty much the same capacity as a 218 Mashburn Bee, which still is 1.37 grains of water less than what a factory 256 will hold. Data from HANDLOADERS HANDBOOK OF CARTRIDGE CONVERSIONS.

    While a 92 (essentially a miniaturized 1886) is pretty stout, I wouldn't care to load one to the pressures common in and normal for 256 WM.
    Clyde' I am not familiar with the .218 Mashburn Bee or the .256 Win. Mag. but what you say make's scence to me.
    As for the strength of the post 1900 Winchester 1892, There has been a lot of 92's re chamberd from .44-40 to .44 Mag. both here and in the U.S. with no problems that i am aware of.
    I played around year's back hotting the .44-40 round up to .44 Mag. presure's with Herco 2400 and the only problem's i found was the bore twist was wrong and blown primer's if i went too hot.
    I am now loading for a .44-40 92 carbine with Re-7 powder and a 240g. hardcast .429-30 projectile with great results.

  18. #18
    Clyde's Avatar
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    The 218 Mashburn Bee is a 218 Bee case "improved" to a design from Mashburn Gun Shop in Oklahoma City. The 218 Bee is a necked down 25-20 (a factory cartridge, not a wildcat), which is essentially a necked down 32-20.

    256 Win Mag is a 357 S&W Magnum necked to use .257" diameter bullets.

    The Model 92, at least in its later production, is quite strong (no surprise - it is, after all, a miniaturized 1886, one of the strongest of lever guns, at least when built out of higher strength alloys as was the case in the last part of the production, especially in such variants as the Model 71), having been successfully converted to 357 Magnum (usually by re-boring 32-20s) and 44 Magnum. Without problems. I still wouldn't want to hot-rod one too much.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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