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  1. #1
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    Default What happened to captured weapons?

    During the first 6 months of WWII, the Japanese captured thousands and thousands of Enfields, Springfields and Dutch Mannlichers. Yet when they were arming for the expected invasion, we here of sharpened bamboo spears, muzzle loaders, and last ditch Type 99s. What happened to all the captured ordnance?
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  2. #2
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    It is a last duty for a soldier to attempt to destroy his weapon before surrendering but the Japanese certainly captured large supplies of weapons in the early days of the war. They did use some themselves but large scale use of captured weapons would cause an ammo supply problem they did not need. They tended to issue captured weapons to local forces they conscripted in their occupied areas, by the end of the war they had pretty well disposed of equipment they had captured earlier in the war.
    Although my neighbors are all barbarians,
    And you, you are a thousand miles away,
    There are always two cups on my table.
    - Tang Dynasty

  3. #3
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    my guess is recycled the material
    WANTED :BATTLE DAMAGED NAVAL HELMETS , TANK,TRUCK, MOTORCYCLE parts

  4. #4
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    They probably stayed pretty much where they were captured and possibly used to arm local police that were willing to ally with Japan. There is at least one photo that has been posted of troops armed with Springfields in the Phillipines.
    Towards the end of the war, very few ships were making it home due to submarines from below and ASW from aircraft above. Maybe quite a few on the ocean floor.

  5. #5
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    Just seems a little odd. The Germans used anything and everything they could get their hands on. Two Panzer divisions invaded France in Czech tanks! Unreal what some of the last ditch "volks" units were carrying.
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  6. #6
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    Default Those guys used everything they could scrounge up.

    I have twenty firearms captured and adapted to Japanese use. Military rifles, shotguns, handguns, the works. Doug

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Douglas I. Kerley View Post
    I have twenty firearms captured and adapted to Japanese use. Military rifles, shotguns, handguns, the works. Doug
    You've got my undivided attention: what weapons and marked/converted how? The only thing close I have come across in 40 years were Dutch Mannlichers converted to 6.5 (I assume these were single shot since converting them to repeaters would be an engineering nightmare!). I thought these were probably done by the Indonesians rather than the Japanese, postwar.
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  8. #8
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    Hello wombat12 :

    As far as the Dutch arms the Japanese used them as is in their original caliber, as ammo in the Indies wasn't a problem. What they did manufacture and install was an adapter bayonet lug so that the rifles would accept the T-30 bayonet.
    The Dutch action without the loading clip was already a single shot proposition. I have seen old Nagant actions converted to single shot by the Japanese for use as trainers but they remained in their original caliber, same goes for old 1888 commision rifles captured from the Chinese.
    Now the Indonesians did convert ex-Dutch arms from 6.5 to .303 by reboring and rechambering the original barrels in the post WW2 era.
    Vicasoto

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicasoto View Post
    Hello wombat12 :
    Now the Indonesians did convert ex-Dutch arms from 6.5 to .303 by reboring and rechambering the original barrels in the post WW2 era.
    Vicasoto
    That what happens when you trust a 40 year old recollection! I remember a Hunters Lodge add from sometime in the 60s featuring Dutch Mannlichers. Remembered they had been converted to something, but now that you mention it, .303 is more logical. Thanks
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