Please_ please_ please_ family pets!!!
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Thread: Please_ please_ please_ family pets!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
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    Jumonville Glen
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    537

    Default Please_ please_ please_ family pets!!!

    While checking my fox traps this morning, in my next to last set, I caught a beagle mix hound. I put my rifle butt between his head and the trapped foot and threw my coat over him. He was about 110 degrees beyond pissed off, and it was COLD out (8 degrees). Anyway, he chewed the pistol grip on my Mossberg 240C something fierce and that gets my goat. If you have dogs or cats or whatever, keep track of them during the open trapping seasons. This dog was a mile and a half from anywhere, on land that I have permission to trap. I know that this will upset some of you but I really don't care. Keep your animals under control or at least on your own property. By the way, he ran off on all fours. chuter
    "You'd know what it is if you needed one!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    North Florida Panhandle
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    2,180

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    Had that to happen to me once back in the 60's when I was trapping bobcats on a wildlife research project for the UGA wildlife dept. Beagles are bad about wandering all over the place anyhow. The dog will recover without lasting injury if it ran off when you released the trap.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    165

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    SFB pet owners these days let em run free where ever. I tell these idiots when I see em your pet is fair game for fox and yotes which are in abundance. They just stare at me like I have a third eye. I have had to kill someone's pet more than once because of trap injuries. I don't enjoy it at all.

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  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Iowa City, IA
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    40

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    Don't throw stones if you live in a glass house.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Beach Va, not Va Beach
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    22,180

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    Quote Originally Posted by woodsrunner 38 View Post
    Had that to happen to me once back in the 60's when I was trapping bobcats on a wildlife research project for the UGA wildlife dept. Beagles are bad about wandering all over the place anyhow. The dog will recover without lasting injury if it ran off when you released the trap.
    60's and 70's standard orders were to kill any stray dog on the dairy farm my grandfather managed, and ditto on the neighbors,

    all knew what each neighbor had for pets, or hunting dogs,
    any unknown was shot and killed, if possible,

    no worries on yotes back then, and bobcats would not mess with the cattle
    what's so funny about peace love and understanding?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Outer Mongolia
    Posts
    8,527

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    Hello Gents,

    In true wildlife areas stray dogs should be shot on sight. They don't belong there. In farming country, folks should be aware of the fact that wandering dogs just might not come home one day. Then there are feral dogs which represent a danger to both humans and livestock.

    I was raised with dogs, love them dearly and everyone in our Family has dogs. We don't have a dog or any other pets because we travel too much of the time. It wouldn't be fair to the animal as much as we're gone.

    I respect your decision chuter. I'm just not sure exactly what I would have done in that circumstance, however more than likely the dog would have become Coyote bait.

    Warmest regards,

    JPS

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Schuylkill cty Pa
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    2,109

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    When I was a boy, we spent summers at my grandfather's house in Kentucky. He told us boys, any dogs you see on his property, shoot them! We asked him what if they belonged to the neighbors? His answer was, "shoot them anyway". Down there, dogs have their place, and its not high on the ladder. In fact they're used for only two reasons, hunting, and for ridding the property (of their owners) of vermin. Any dog that was off the owner's property was fair game, and the neighbors all had the same mindset on their properties. Closest I ever got was popping one in the butt with my pellet gun. Funny though, not many dogs were killed around there, as people were responsible back then. But they also knew that if their dog wandered off, there was a better than average chance it wasn't coming back.

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    The Arizona Territory
    Posts
    11,484

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    When I was a kid in High School, I'd spend time with the Dachshund and a .20 gauge SxS out in an area along the river just north of town. Used to pi$$ off Mom when I brought home a rabbit for dinner, mainly because she grew up on wild game & it used to irk her to bite down on any shot left in the meat. Consequently she insisted on dressing whatever I brought home herself, although I'd salt & borax hides out in the garage. Mom made great fried chicken, but would always make Shake& Bake bunny, oven baking it.

    Normally I'd let the dog chase after rabbits, but she was never quite fast enough. We'd come home with out firing a shot. If I needed more pelts to sell, I'd go out with Dad's .22 mag Ruger Single Six.

    Occasionally I come upon a carcass of a fox that looked like it had been torn apart while still alive. I called Fish & Game and told them about it & they said they had other complaints. Someone saw some guy out "hunting" with his 2 beagles. It wasn't legal & they wanted me to call them if I could get any information.

    One day I heard some stupid horn blaring in the distance & here comes Jeeves - all duded up in some English huntsman knickers & waistcoat & silly hat. He turned his "fox hounds" loose to practice their trade. Ever see a fox after 2 dogs are done playing tug-o-war, ripping it apart while it was still alive? It's stomach turning.

    Fortunately I had the .22 mag & shot both dogs, grabbed their collars and tags & ran after Mr. English nobleman. Got his license number as he roared off & gave it & the tags to Fish & Game.

    The local Police Chief personally stopped by the house one evening & handed me a check for $150 for solving the problem of the "wildlife murders." Seems that some Girl Scouts c& other do-gooders came upon some mutilated foxes, complained about it and took up a collection for a reward. The reward got me more .22 mag ammo, a belt sheath for my Buck 110 knife, some extra traps for my winter muskrat trapline & the rest disappeared into a savings account towards my college education - likely bought beer & condoms ...
    "Hey Look! We've got Guns ... and We've got Snacks!"
    - Cdr. Samuel "Sam" Axe, USN, (ret) -

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Outer Mongolia
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    8,527

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    Morning Gents,

    Kudos for doing the right thing AZ and better still that your future hunts would be well funded! Being able to afford more ammunition reminds me of my youth. This is a wee bit off topic, but what the heah!

    When I was youngster my Sunday allowance paid for a box of 50 Winchester Western .22 Short. With an older brother who had no interest in firearms, I lucked out and at the age of 8 inherited my Grandfather's M1890 Winchester Pump-action Rifle with the octagonal barrel. To this day, within the range of the .22 short cartridge, that barrel heavy rifle was and is as accurate as any other rifle I own.

    We lived at the end of a street that bordered a 10 sq. mile ranch. My Mother loved roses and the spacious side yard of the house had a row of different colored rose bushes. The only problem was, the rabbits and gophers loved them too! Mom paid a bounty on both, $ .25 per rabbit and $ .10 per gopher. My Dad gave up on trying to keep the screen in place on the bathroom window! Every morning before school I got up early and slowly opened the bathroom window overlooking the rose bushes. The survivors caught on pretty quickly, but I still managed to claim enough bounties to buy an extra box of ammo each month.

    My best friend and I wandered the fields and hills with our .22s on the portion of the ranch that bordered our lot. Back in those days, two youngsters wandering around with rifles was an accepted right of passage. We were responsible kids. Sad to say, today it would draw a SWAT team!

    Warmest regards,

    JPS

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