Surplus 7mm ammo, thoughts?
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Thread: Surplus 7mm ammo, thoughts?

  1. #1
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    Default Surplus 7mm ammo, thoughts?

    Just seeing if someone with experience with it can give me a quick run down on what to expect with Spanish 7mm surplus ammo.
    I picked up a box of 50 for less than the price of a 20rd current production box. Came in a cool original package box marked " Cartuchos de Guerra
    Para fusile Mauser Mod. 1893" Has an InterArms sticker on the side.
    They are headstamped PS with 1953. All are in nice shape, no green corrosion or anything that looks out of place. About the same look as my Turk 8mm thats made in 1943.
    Any concerns with shooting it? I assume its corrosive, so I will clean accordingly. Maybe hangfire prone? Even though Turk 8mm is very reliable and even older. Is the brass reloadable or it is one and done like the 8mm?
    I have a new to me M95 Chilean coming tomorrow and wanted some cheap ammo to put through it, before I can get hand loads made for it, as I do for all my milsurps. Thanks for any comments.
    In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.
    ~FDR (1936)


  2. #2
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    It won't be reloadable, and may not shoot well, watch out for hangfires and duds. Other than that, I don't see any red flags.

  3. #3
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    I would pull the bullets and use them with boxer brass. Like Regis said, they'll not be worth much as is.
    "Don't rejoice in his defeat, you men. For though the world stood up and stopped the bastard, the bitch that bore him is in heat again." -Bertolt Brecht

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  5. #4
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    I bought a 7mm Mauser back in 1971, along with a box of Spanish ammo (marked "Interarms", as yours is). I fired a few rounds, saw bulging above the case head, and took the rifle to a gun shop to be checked out. Gun shop said headspace was gone, and bad place in the chamber. Hung the rifle on the wall for the next 40 years. Finally decided to try to do something with it, took pictures of the empty cases, and wrote to these gunboards. It wasn't the rifle after all---just cheap, crummy ammo. After buying some good ammo, rifle shoots like a dream. I WASTED 40 YEARS OF NOT SHOOTING THIS RIFLE BECAUSE OF CRUMMY AMMO. Buy good ammo and enjoy shooting.
    I don't like making plans for the day---because then the word "premeditated" gets thrown around in the courtroom.

  6. #5
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    PS = Fábrica de Pirotecnia Militar de Sevilla, in Spain.

  7. #6
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    For the price of Prvi Par I would buy a few boxes to shoot. Stick the original box on the shelf for your display.

  8. #7
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    Standard procedure with any military surplus ammo is to pick the worst-looking example and whack out the bullet with an inertial puller, dump the powder onto a clean sheet of white paper and examine the base of the bullet, the propellant (under magnification) and the inside of the case under strong light. Look for corrosion on the bullet or internal case walls, clumpy powder, red dust mixed in or any other signs of deterioration. That will give you a general idea of its condition. If it passes visual inspection, chamber the empty case and attempt to fire it. If you get a click or a click-bang, don't bother with the rest of that ammo.

    M

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Braino View Post
    I bought a 7mm Mauser back in 1971, along with a box of Spanish ammo (marked "Interarms", as yours is). I fired a few rounds, saw bulging above the case head, and took the rifle to a gun shop to be checked out. Gun shop said headspace was gone, and bad place in the chamber. Hung the rifle on the wall for the next 40 years. Finally decided to try to do something with it, took pictures of the empty cases, and wrote to these gunboards. It wasn't the rifle after all---just cheap, crummy ammo. After buying some good ammo, rifle shoots like a dream. I WASTED 40 YEARS OF NOT SHOOTING THIS RIFLE BECAUSE OF CRUMMY AMMO. Buy good ammo and enjoy shooting.
    Sounds like the gunsmith had a part to play in that too.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGMike View Post
    Standard procedure with any military surplus ammo is to pick the worst-looking example and whack out the bullet with an inertial puller, dump the powder onto a clean sheet of white paper and examine the base of the bullet, the propellant (under magnification) and the inside of the case under strong light. Look for corrosion on the bullet or internal case walls, clumpy powder, red dust mixed in or any other signs of deterioration. That will give you a general idea of its condition. If it passes visual inspection, chamber the empty case and attempt to fire it. If you get a click or a click-bang, don't bother with the rest of that ammo.

    M
    Exl Post...Should Sticky
    "There is no safety for honest men, but by believing all possible evil of evil men, and by acting with promptitude, decision, and steadiness on that belief." (Edmund Burke)

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shoots High View Post
    Sounds like the gunsmith had a part to play in that too.
    If the case bulged it had someplace to bulge to, (bad place in chamber) with smooth chamber how would it bulge? New brass may just have thicker case. Head space is a different matter, may be very small amount out of spec. If bulge was right ahead of rim then it could be very bad.

  12. #11
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    If it is the round-nose silver colored ammo - I wouldn't shoot it.

    the bullets shoot nice off reloads, the ammo is extremely iffy.
    pure jebberish

    "You don't think you're perfect but you do think you're always right."
    -my wife

  13. #12
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    Thanks for the replies fellas. This ammo is copper colored FMJ. And I checked it does not attract a magnet. I will pull one tonight and use said advice. Thanks.
    In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.
    ~FDR (1936)


  14. #13
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    ****UPDATE****
    Well I finely got some spare time and headed to the range after work and shot the new to me 1895 Mauser. Fired a few Prvi 139 grain soft points first to check for function, of course went flawlessly, smoked a milk jug at 100 yards.
    Switched to the surplus 7mm. Out of 25 rounds fired 3 were slight hangfires, one took 2 strikes of the firing pin to fire. I had arranged them by cosmetics on worse to better, so started out with the dirtiest looking rounds first. By the end the last 15 rounds were shooting flawlessly. Accurate on 12'' steel plates/milk jugs at 100 yards. Nothing spectacular but good enough for informal off handed rapid fire plinking. I have 25 more rounds to shoot next time. For under .20 a shot, they worked as intended for cheap fodder for my 1895. I was pleased. I finished the trip with 10 rounds of 158gr Prvi soft points. Amazing effects on water bottles and milk jugs!
    The biggest down side is how incredibly dirty the surplus rounds were. Only 25 rounds fired, my bore looked like I'd shot several hundred! I used Hope's #9, as I have with other corrosive rounds in my Mausers and Mosins haven't had a problem yet. I used to use ammonia Windex but never saw any difference with clean. But after these, I'm done with surplus and corrosive ammo in general. I'm addicted to reloading, and the so so performance of surplus only was appealing when it was dirt cheap when I was a younger man. Now I have the patience and funds to make quality ammo, I think I'll leave the old stuff for the kids to blast dirt with. Thanks for the replies, it was a fun experience with surplus of a new caliber.
    In the truest sense, freedom cannot be bestowed; it must be achieved.
    ~FDR (1936)


  15. #14
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    Speaking just for myself, I would not trust Hoppe's No. 9 or Windex to clean the salts from the bore after shooting corrosive-primed ammo such as the Spanish surplus. After a few days the salt residue can start creeping out of the pores in the steel. If there is no follow-up cleaning, you may discover a rusty bore. This is partly why, up through WWII, Army field manuals insisted that three successive cleanings were necessary to avoid corrosion.

    Since much of the military surplus ammo I have on hand is old and corrosive-primed, I have reduced bore cleaning to a system aimed at saving time and avoiding repetitive cleaning.

    It's safest to use GI bore cleaner, or CLP, both of which were formulated to dissolve salts, or just some liquid laundry detergent like Wisk on a patch, then flushed with very hot water. I keep my hot water heater at 140 degrees just for that reason and have rigged a old washer hose that screws on the the faucet in the laundry tub, with a nozzle on the other end small enough to be inserted into the chamber. After a minute or two of running water through the bore, the pores are opened up and the salts thoroughly dissolved; the barrel will get too hot to touch. One dry patch is enough to dry it, as the retained heat rapidly evaporates any remaining moisture. At that point the barrel is clean and bone dry and will oxidize unless it's oiled. This is a good moment to run through some patches with Hoppe's to loosen and remove any copper "wash" on the lands. Finally, spray some CLP into the chamber, let it drain out through the muzzle, blow out the excess with dry compressed air, and you're done.

    M

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