First PU sniper range trip. Also a Finn'd centenarian
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Thread: First PU sniper range trip. Also a Finn'd centenarian

  1. #1
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    Default First PU sniper range trip. Also a Finn'd centenarian

    Spent a week up in northern Minnesota at the family homestead. Finally got a chance to put a few rounds through the PU I picked up from AIM surplus a couple years back. (Here's the thread on the rifle.)

    I dropped it into a spare refurb stock I had laying around so as not to damage the fragile shellac or markings of the original matching stock. Was afraid that it would shoot badly due to poor bedding so I brought shim stock and tools with me, but it proved to not be an issue. At least so far, since I definitely bumped up against my skill ceiling.

    Tried a few flavors of ammo, and found it seemed to like the Hungarian LPS the best. It will take some time to figure out the trigger and proper chin-weld as so many of you have noted previously. Best group after zeroing (range about 90m) is pictured below. The trigger is not the greatest. Has a couple sticky spots and one weird "sproing" partway through the pull. Tempted to snag an E-bay Finn trigger. Guy in the orange hat is my brother. He shot a nice group too.

    Also put a few ceremonial rounds through a 1917 Sestroryetsk that I'd not fired before. It works. These WWI-dated Russian M91s have a lot more meaning to me these days, after reading Väinö Linna's Under The North Star, vols. I and II (reading III now). Highly recommend the series to any students of Finnish history (or human history, for that matter). The Finnish Civil War, around which vol. II is set, is a significant and difficult part of the history of many of our Finnish-used Mosin rifles that I, at least, had never given much thought to. Not to get political at all, but it's useful to consider the extremes of both socialism and nationalism, each of which played a role in horrific bloodshed in Finland, a scant couple decades before the Winter War that I've spent so much time studying. Illuminating stuff.

    Anyhow.... on to pics.





    Rucksack rest









    Turret settings after zeroing at 90ish meters.


    And here's the M91. Thanks for checking in.




  2. #2
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    Fantastic pictures. Thanks for sharing.

  3. #3
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    Great photos and nice shooting. Curious, I assume the flyer was 5th shot? How much time between shots? I know it doesn't take long to heat'em up! Isn't it odd for the vertical to be set at 4 for 90M? I've always thought you set these at 0 for both wind and vertical? Thanks

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jaws2 View Post
    Great photos and nice shooting. Curious, I assume the flyer was 5th shot? How much time between shots? I know it doesn't take long to heat'em up! Isn't it odd for the vertical to be set at 4 for 90M? I've always thought you set these at 0 for both wind and vertical? Thanks
    Flyer was certainly just me. Can't remember which shot in the string it was but I do recall calling it. Temp was about 20F and I was taking my time, but not waiting especially long between shots.

    I'm supposed to go and re-set the turrets now that it's zeroed. Then it will be at 0 and 0. I tried doing it on the bench in the cold but didn't want to risk losing/scratching anything. Pic I took was for reference in case they got bumped before I had a chance to re-set the turrets.

  6. #5
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    Great Pictures!

    I think those three shots that are in a nearly perfect horizontal line, show you were having a bit of trouble with the trigger pull as you said.

    I've installed a Finn trigger and sear on my Tula, and I'll never regret it. It made a huge difference in the group size for that rifle. Plus you can always change it back to original with out any problems. I say "go for it"!

    The other two shots, might have been because your eye wasn't in the same place relative to the scope as the other horizontal three. As Zeebill says, it takes a while of shooting a particular rifle to really reach it's accuracy potential.

    Thanks for posting those pictures!

  7. #6
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    Great day and photos.

    For newcomers, you adjust and turn the turret number dial to your zero range by carefully loosening the screws and turning the number ring while carefully keeping the main turret from turning. Don't take the screws out, just loosen them, turn to your zero, remembering that meters are not yards, and tighten again.

    You would set it at the range you zero for, a 1 if zeroed for 100 meters.

    The Red Army snipers usually zeroed at 100 meters (about 2 inches high at 100 meters if you want to set for a 200 meter zero) but they generally kept the turret at 300 meters, making it shoot a point blank POI to a bit beyond 300 meters. This allowed most normal combat and overwatch shooting to be done without adjusting the scope, throwing in some Kentucky windage as required.

    A big advantage of the Mosin snipers is that the rifle can shift instantly to co-witnessed iron sights for close range shooting, something many modern sniper rifles can not do, making them nearly useless at closer range.

    Another big advantage is the wide field of view and the extreme depth of field, features pointed out to me by a SEAL sniper who shot my PU. Shots can be taken very quickly at varying moderately long to short ranges with no adjustments at all, and a holdover to an experienced sniper extended the rapid target range even more. The lower power 3.5X was a weakness at long range, but allowed as trade-off the depth of field and wide view. (The SEAL hated the Mosin trigger, liked the scope and said it was even now a very deadly rifle. He knew all about it from sniper school, but had never actually fired on before. And yes, he shot very, very well.)

    The barrel wrap technique will probably tighten your groups by reducing the lateral stringing, as will just breaking in the rifle and tightening the action screws as they move in place.
    Last edited by Stalin's Ghost; 02-14-2017 at 12:58 AM.

  8. #7
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    Thanks for the extra info, SG. It does need some more shooting to "settle in" before I start shimming/wrapping anything. Will definitely be checking the action screws and scope mount screws. I did use loctite on the bottom elevation adjustment mount screw.

  9. #8
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    If yours shoots that good with surplus, you have a good PU. I have never gotten good groups with Hungarian LPS in 15 or 20 PUs I have run it through. Hungarian HB, esp. in Finns, is pretty good. I believe in using the best ammo I can get and not messing with ordinary surplus. The bore wear and cleaning burden is the same. The results are not.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalin's Ghost View Post
    Great day and photos.

    For newcomers, you adjust and turn the turret number dial to your zero range by carefully loosening the screws and turning the number ring while carefully keeping the main turret from turning. Don't take the screws out, just loosen them, turn to your zero, remembering that meters are not yards, and tighten again.

    You would set it at the range you zero for, a 1 if zeroed for 100 meters.

    The Red Army snipers usually zeroed at 100 meters (about 2 inches high at 100 meters if you want to set for a 200 meter zero) but they generally kept the turret at 300 meters, making it shoot a point blank POI to a bit beyond 300 meters. This allowed most normal combat and overwatch shooting to be done without adjusting the scope, throwing in some Kentucky windage as required.

    A big advantage of the Mosin snipers is that the rifle can shift instantly to co-witnessed iron sights for close range shooting, something many modern sniper rifles can not do, making them nearly useless at closer range.

    Another big advantage is the wide field of view and the extreme depth of field, features pointed out to me by a SEAL sniper who shot my PU. Shots can be taken very quickly at varying moderately long to short ranges with no adjustments at all, and a holdover to an experienced sniper extended the rapid target range even more. The lower power 3.5X was a weakness at long range, but allowed as trade-off the depth of field and wide view. (The SEAL hated the Mosin trigger, liked the scope and said it was even now a very deadly rifle. He knew all about it from sniper school, but had never actually fired on before. And yes, he shot very, very well.)

    The barrel wrap technique will probably tighten your groups by reducing the lateral stringing, as will just breaking in the rifle and tightening the action screws as they move in place.
    Hi Stalin's Ghost! My PU sniper shoots very well except that my windage turret walks to the right after about 6 shots and I find myself keeping an eye on it and resetting it back. Any fix for that?

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow64 View Post
    Hi Stalin's Ghost! My PU sniper shoots very well except that my windage turret walks to the right after about 6 shots and I find myself keeping an eye on it and resetting it back. Any fix for that?

    There are a bunch of threads on the scopes on the sniper forum. Do some homework there.

    Raspooten?sp? can fix it. Probably a leather washer or a flat spring. Not a big deal. Never hurts to have a spare scope if you can find one for a good price. He has had those too. It is hard to have too many.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike radford View Post
    If yours shoots that good with surplus, you have a good PU. I have never gotten good groups with Hungarian LPS in 15 or 20 PUs I have run it through. Hungarian HB, esp. in Finns, is pretty good. I believe in using the best ammo I can get and not messing with ordinary surplus. The bore wear and cleaning burden is the same. The results are not.
    That's encouraging. I am set up to reload, and will do so for this rifle if I keep shooting it, or decide to hunt with it. I just don't get as much range time as I used to.

    I did try some Russian LPS with similar results to the Hungarian LPS; some Barnaul and some Prvi Partisan heavy-ball soft points but those seemed to group more in the 3-4" range.

    Shadow: re: moving turrets. Another good reason to take a photo of them when they're "on" as a reference for future wandering.

  13. #12
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    Where abouts up north? My family homestead is in Wuori Township.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leppala View Post
    Where abouts up north? My family homestead is in Wuori Township.
    Not too far! We're over in Toimi. My GGGFather was born in 1886 in Pori, Finland, and homesteaded in Toimi right around the turn of the century.

  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stalin's Ghost View Post
    The lower power 3.5X was a weakness at long range, but allowed as trade-off the depth of field and wide view.
    I take a different out look , I find the PU scope outstanding for shooting at 1000 yds , no alibi. My beef is the stock is so low you can't get a cheek weld and that costs you accuracy. If you toss a bean bag on top of stock and you now can have cheek solid on stock and your eyes looking directly down the scope. Only a comment for long range. At 300 to 600, the stock is just fine. The scope is fine 100 to 1000 yds in my view.

    For Skywarp: Great shots and great photos. Your shot at target in woods showing through the scope is classic..it shows how great this scope reticle is for combat use.

  16. #15
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    Awesome pics & some sweet rifles! Thanks for sharing! Now I want to take my PU out to the range this weekend. Haven't had her out in quite some time.

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by mike radford View Post
    There are a bunch of threads on the scopes on the sniper forum. Do some homework there.

    Raspooten?sp? can fix it. Probably a leather washer or a flat spring. Not a big deal. Never hurts to have a spare scope if you can find one for a good price. He has had those too. It is hard to have too many.
    Thank you, mike! I will do exactly that.

  18. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by skywarp View Post
    Not too far! We're over in Toimi. My GGGFather was born in 1886 in Pori, Finland, and homesteaded in Toimi right around the turn of the century.
    Sweet! First bits of my family came over around that time, though the other bit didnt come til the 1930s and then again in the late 40s. Cool!

  19. #18
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    Great post, love the pics.

    Now load up some 174gr. .311 Sierra Matchkings or .312 Hornadys for that PU and watch it go!







  20. #19
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    I think you need a new leather washer in the turret, but it isn't a scary job. You might even be able to clean and rough up the old one, but often they are really wrecked from grease and age.
    Somewhere on GB is a post to read before starting, showing how.
    These were all replaced in most refurb scopes done at Kiev Arsenal but the problem sometimes comes up in other scopes.

    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow64 View Post
    Hi Stalin's Ghost! My PU sniper shoots very well except that my windage turret walks to the right after about 6 shots and I find myself keeping an eye on it and resetting it back. Any fix for that?

  21. #20
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    Skywarp; Like the use of the NRA Smallbore target . Is that something you shoot also?

  22. #21
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    Forgot to mention, those are great photos and good shooting.

  23. #22
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    Great shooting, great pics. I shot my Polish M44 for the first time this weekend. Just want to mention that it was t-shirt weather over here, too. Looks awful cold over there.

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