FN - Mexico Contract Connection
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Thread: FN - Mexico Contract Connection

  1. #1
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    Default FN - Mexico Contract Connection

    I have been photographing a number of items for sale recently and noticed a connection between two seemingly unrelated items. I have some FN produced (my belief) parts for Yugoslavia for the initial contract of 1924 rifles. I also have been looking at a bunch of Mexican Mauser bolts. Both exhibit a circle V marking. Could be completely coincidence.

    Does anyone know, did FN do a contract run of bolts for Mexico? These bolts are the 1936 style with the gas vent cut at the top of the bolt face.

    Vanderlinden mentioned that Mexico had manufacturing capacity, but it was VERY slow. Mexico purchased from FN as the need was immediate. I wondered if maybe they also purchased parts/spares for their 1902/1910/1936 rifles?

    First picture is of a 1936 bolt, I have several I can take pictures of if anyone would like. Second picture is of a Yugoslavian 1924 bottom metal that I believe would have been manufactured by FN for the first 100,000 rifles made prior to start of domestic production. The floor plate has the same circle V marking.

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  2. #2
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    I suspect that your circle V markings are just similar markings that happened to be used by both FN and Mexico.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

    Regards,
    Bill


    All my Mausers are here (Index is in post #1):
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    I never found any reference to this...

    Anthony

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    the spare 1910 bolt body that i have mentioned previously has the same mark,in the same place. it has no other proof marks that would help identify the mfg facility. i'm not well informed about FN mfg,but it seems to me that every bolt i've seen from FN has marks that show it was mfg at FN.
    Last edited by Frosty; 03-29-2017 at 12:13 PM. Reason: add comment

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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Vanderlinden View Post
    I never found any reference to this...

    Anthony
    Maybe the trigger guard with the circle V was made in Yugoslavia. The circle V marking on both parts does not look the same.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

    Regards,
    Bill


    All my Mausers are here (Index is in post #1):
    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?144316-Mausers-Only-Mausers

    III, GOA Life





  7. #6
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    Mexican Model 1910 and Model 1936 Mausers are completely indigenous production. FN did manufacture Model 24 carbines for Mexico. I don't know if Mexico ever purchased model 1924 short rifles though.

    Vlad

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    Thank you all for your comments.

    Quote Originally Posted by Vladymere View Post
    Mexican Model 1910 and Model 1936 Mausers are completely indigenous production.

    Vlad
    I understand this, but the topic really came up after looking through the 1902 DWM actions that I own. ALL of them have 1936 bolts as pictured above. Then when I was taking the pictures above I noticed the similar mark. It occurred to me that sense Mexico was doing business with FN, and was in dire need of arms, bolts are an excellent stop gap to bring worn firearms back into service.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vladymere View Post
    Mexican Model 1910 and Model 1936 Mausers are completely indigenous production. FN did manufacture Model 24 carbines for Mexico. I don't know if Mexico ever purchased model 1924 short rifles though.

    Vlad
    Mexico ordered 4,000 FN1924 carbines and 24,000 FN1924 short rifles (quantities thanks to Anthony, page 281 FN Mauser Rifles). Strange but I have seen more carbines for sale than short rifles - but those carbines were few and far between.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mexican FN24 2.JPG   Mexican FN24 3.JPG  
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

    Regards,
    Bill


    All my Mausers are here (Index is in post #1):
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    The Mexican contract was signed before April of 1927. Carbines were delivered January-April 1927 and the short rifles arrived in Mexico City on November 10th, 1927. Some carbines were delivered in .22LR as trainers. 7mm Mauser ammunition was purchased at the same time. Mexican records indicate only 5,000 of each.

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    That would explain the rarity of Mexican FN1924 short rifles if 24,000 were ordered but only 5,000 were delivered.

    Anthony, are you seeing this? Jim has somehow acquired a lot of records from Mexico.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

    Regards,
    Bill


    All my Mausers are here (Index is in post #1):
    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?144316-Mausers-Only-Mausers

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  12. #11
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    Thanks for the information on the FN 1924 short rifles sold to Mexico.

    Fal Grunt, Are you telling us that you have 1902 DWM receivers with model 1936 Mexican bolt bodies in them? Are these 1902 DWM receivers model 98 receivers? Are they standard length or medium length receivers? If these are model 98 receivers where is the bolt face of the model 36 Mexican bolt in relation ship to the primary torque shoulder on the 1902 receiver?

    I ask because Mexican model 1910 and 1936 receivers and bolts are of a unique dimension that is shorter than a medium length Mauser. A medium length bolt will protrude about a 10th of an inch beyond the torque shoulder on a Mexican 1910 or 1936 receiver. This is why I ask the above questions.

    Vlad

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    The original "Mexican Mauser" was produced by DWM in contract 1902. All the examples I have seen and the ones I own are dated 1903. They are identical in almost every respect to the Mexican produced 1910 and 1936 type rifles, except, in my opinion, much better workmanship. Will link a few threads and post more details later.

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    Thanks for responding FAL GRunt. I look forward to the thread links. Are the 1902 DWM Mexican Mausers built on a standard length receiver, a medium length receiver or a Mexican 1910/1936 length receiver?

    Vlad

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    Ok, here is a quick synopsis. I took several pictures that I will upload hopefully tonight, but probably tomorrow.

    p 255, Mauser Military Rifles of the World, Robert Ball has a small amount of information and a picture or two.

    A fantastic set of photo's of one:
    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...WM-Modelo-1902

    Wish mine were complete....

    The DWM produced rifles, are for all intensive purposes, identical to the 1910. At least in terms of the action. The receiver, bolt, bottom metal, are all the *unique* intermediate length action that is particular to the Mexican. The bottom metal does interchange with other 93-95 bottom metal. The bolt itself is unique, as the is 1910 and 1936 and should interchange between the three. The 1936, as you probably know, is unique in having extra gas venting features. Primarily, the bolt face, extractor and receiver. However it is not clear to me exactly WHEN this was introduced.

    I have found frequently referenced that 38,000 rifles were made with an unknown number of carbines. Would love to get some primary sources.

    I own D 8756 which would be right at the max extent of 38,000. I also own F 3824, which would imply more than 38,000 for the contract, if numbered in the typical DWM fashion. It could be possible to conclude, if primary sources were to verify the 38,000 rifles, that the remainder was in fact carbines. Approximately 5,000 to 6,000. Again, we would need some primary documents to verify any of this.

    John Wall noted in the thread that he wondered if the reason the 1902's were rare was that they were converted into 1910's and 1936's. This *could* be a possibility, but I have not seen the connection as of yet. The DWM receivers have unique process markings compared to the Mexican domestically produced receivers that are VERY "FN"-esque markings. I have not, as yet, found a domestically marked Mexican with the same markings as a DWM. Certainly my limited scope has not examined a broad section.

    I will certianly continue studying this subject. I will also contact Baudino and see if he has any DWM documents. If anyone has SimsonSuhl's contact, maybe he can forward a question to Mr. Speed as to DWM's 1902 production records and if he has anything on the subject? I will be looking through his old posts and seeing if I can cross reference any of the sales documents he has posted in the past. From Mr. Speed I have Mauser records back to 1901, but DWM only back to 1907. That may be the extent of his records?

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    You can see the two actions are in almost every regard, identical. The DWM action at some point had its serial number altered which is a shame. I put the last picture up of the DWM markings. On my "to-do" list is to go through all of the DWM actions and all the Mexican actions I have and catalog their markings and serial numbers. Then start a survey. While I know Mexico and Germany had a relationship both Militarily and Economically, it would be interesting to further study the connection. I personally would not be surprised if DWM set up Mexican domestic production under license. What I am interested to study further is WHY the unique receiver for Mexico and why was it never used in any other production? Was the receiver designed/specified by Mexico? Was the idea that stocks and bottom metal and other parts could be carried over from 95 production and available inventory for both DWM and Mexico? These rifles are frequently refereed to as 1902's but I have yet to see a receiver crest marked 1902. I have yet to see an early block either.

    I find the 1902 an interesting step in the progression of Mauser and DWM.
    Last edited by Fal Grunt; 04-03-2017 at 05:32 PM.

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    Fal Grunt,

    Thank you for this excellent synopsis.

    I had been looking about on the net in the interim and found one reference stating the 1902 wan an intermediate length action and another reference indicating it was an action identical to the 1910 and 1936 as far as length and bolt dimensions. I'm aware that Mauser produced four action lengths, at least commercially, kurz (short), intermediate, standard and large or magnum. I have always considered the FN 1930 and Yugoslav M24 (originaly FN 24) and M48 as and intermediate length with the Mexican 1910/1936 being shorter than the intermediate length and exclusive in it's dimensions. Apparently the Mexican 1910 and 1936 are not exclusive since they match the Mauser 1902 dimensions.

    As I said I had thought Mauser actions fell into four lengths with the Mexican being and exclusive oddball. In poking around the net I found a posting by bear 88 listing eleven action lengths. What follows is the information that bear 88 posted. I have lost the link to his original posting,

    M98 STANDARD LENGTH ACTIONS #1
    [-]

    Jul 14 03 12:41 AM

    o I am going to group different actions by length, ring diameter, and barrel shank diameter. The first group will be Type I, these are the "most standard" Mausers. Probably 75% or more of all Mausers produced after 1898 will fall into this category. I am not going to list every model, that would take a book of it's own, but if your particular model is not listed, comparing the dimensions will place it into the correct category. So here are the dimensions for

    Type I:
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410 large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    Some of the models that fall into Type I are:
    Chilean M1912, Steyr
    GEW 98, various mfr's
    Brazilian M1908/34, Brno
    VZ24, 98/22, 98/29, Brno
    M1908 Brazilian, DWM
    M1909 Argentine, DWM
    M24/30 Venezuelan, FN
    M1935 Peruvian, FN
    Standard Modell, Mauser Oberndorf
    K98k, various mfr's

    Remember that the above list is not all-inclusive, the truth is, MOST M98 Mausers fall into this category.
    ________________________________________


    Type II, standard length, small ring, small shank
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980 small shank

    This is pretty much a Czechoslovakian design, the main members of this group are the VZ33 and the G33-40, a commercial version is the VZ47.
    ________________________________________


    Type III, standard length, small ring, large shank
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7,835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    As you can see by comparing the receiver ring diameter and the barrel shank diameter, there is not a lot of meat left in this receiver! The main example is the Kar98, and for obvious reasons, it is not wise to rechamber these to a high pressure cartridge.
    ________________________________________


    Type IV, standard length, small ring, small shank, long magazine.
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.400
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980 small shank

    These are mainly commercial models, they are identical to Type II, with the exception of a longer magazine to handle 30-06 length cartridges. Main examples are the Husqvarna commercial action, and the Brno ZG47.
    ________________________________________


    Type V, standard length, large ring, large shank, long magazine.
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.400
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410 large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    This is a beefier version of the Type IV. It is typified by the late FN commercial actions.


    bear8mm
    Re: M98 INTERMEDIATE LENGTH ACTIONS #2
    [-]

    Jul 14 03 10:50 PM
    o This is actually a fairly small group of models, the amount of headaches these cause (when trying to find a part or stock) is way out of proportion to the number of models. Most of these will have some part of the action shortened to save weight. Starting off with Type VI:

    Type VI, Oberndorf intermediate action
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.165
    Magazine length: 3.115
    Receiver ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    I call this the Oberndorf intermediate action, as they are the only ones who produced it. Commonly encountered models include:
    1903 Turk
    1909 Peruvian
    1935 Argentine
    Oberndorf Commercial

    The 1903 Turk and the 1909 Peruvian also share some other qualities. They both have a very high clip bridge, and a long curved arm on the ejector box that puts pressure on a stripper clip loaded into the receiver, holding it in place. The 1935 Argentine and the Oberndorf commercial action do not have this.
    This type has a longer than normal receiver ring, and a longer than normal cocking piece, with a shorter than normal bolt body, hard to figure where the weight savings come in!
    The Oberndorf commercial action was also available in a small ring version, all other dimensions identical.
    ________________________________________


    Type VII, FN24 and Yugo actions
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.115
    Magazine length: 3.232
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank

    This is the FN M24 action, and the Yugoslavian M48 series. I call this group the Yugoslavian intermediate action. There is also a Type VIIA, FN24 Mexican, see below.
    ________________________________________


    Type VIIA, FN24 Mexican
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.165
    Magazine length: 3.232
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank

    I call the Type VIIA the Mexican large ring action. The only difference between the Type VII and VIIA is the length of the bolt body (0.050 difference).
    ________________________________________


    Type VIII, small ring Mexican
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.080
    Magazine length: 3.118
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300, small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    The Type VIII has the shortest bolt body in this group. Common models are the Mexican M1910, and M1936. Either one can be found manufactured by FN or Fabrica de Armas in Mexico City.


    bear8mm
    Re: LONG AND SHORT ACTIONS #3
    [-]

    Jul 16 03 10:16 PM
    Now we are into the expensive stuff! The long actions and short actions are commercial only. The long actions are divided into 2 types, the "British" type and the French type. The British type are not necessarily made in England, but are usually chambered for British cartridges, such as the .416 Rigby or .404 Jeffery. The French type is even longer than the British type, but the French type is actually made in France.

    Type IX, British Type, aka M98 long, aka Commercial Magnum
    Action OAL: 9.150
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.770
    Magazine length: 3.640/3.840
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank
    ________________________________________


    Type X, French Type, aka French Magnum, aka Brevex Magnum
    Action OAL: 9.240
    Recvr screws, center to center: 8.207
    Bolt body length: 6.740
    Magazine length: 3.900
    Recvr ring dia: 1.500, X-large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.141, X-large shank.

    Notice that the French magnum is larger in every dimension than the British magnum, but the French bolt is shorter by .030"
    ________________________________________


    Type XI, "True" short action, aka Commercial Kurz
    Action OAL: 8.125
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.225
    Bolt body length: 5.760
    Magazine length: 2.725
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300, small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    These are very rare and expensive, and a collector's item on their own. Chambered for short cartridges such as the .250 Savage, they are so hard to come by that they are often made by cutting down a standard Type I M98 action. If you suspect you have one, look for a welded receiver just forward of the thumb cut. Bolts are usually welded just behind the aft end of the guide rib.





    Type III, standard length, small ring, large shank
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7,835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.315
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    As you can see by comparing the receiver ring diameter and the barrel shank diameter, there is not a lot of meat left in this receiver! The main example is the Kar98, and for obvious reasons, it is not wise to rechamber these to a high pressure cartridge.
    ________________________________________


    Type IV, standard length, small ring, small shank, long magazine.
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.400
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300 small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980 small shank

    These are mainly commercial models, they are identical to Type II, with the exception of a longer magazine to handle 30-06 length cartridges. Main examples are the Husqvarna commercial action, and the Brno ZG47.
    ________________________________________


    Type V, standard length, large ring, large shank, long magazine.
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.370
    Magazine length: 3.400
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410 large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100 large shank

    This is a beefier version of the Type IV. It is typified by the late FN commercial actions.


    bear8mm
    Re: M98 INTERMEDIATE LENGTH ACTIONS #2
    [-]

    Jul 14 03 10:50 PM
    o This is actually a fairly small group of models, the amount of headaches these cause (when trying to find a part or stock) is way out of proportion to the number of models. Most of these will have some part of the action shortened to save weight. Starting off with Type VI:

    Type VI, Oberndorf intermediate action
    Action OAL: 8.750
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.165
    Magazine length: 3.115
    Receiver ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    I call this the Oberndorf intermediate action, as they are the only ones who produced it. Commonly encountered models include:
    1903 Turk
    1909 Peruvian
    1935 Argentine
    Oberndorf Commercial

    The 1903 Turk and the 1909 Peruvian also share some other qualities. They both have a very high clip bridge, and a long curved arm on the ejector box that puts pressure on a stripper clip loaded into the receiver, holding it in place. The 1935 Argentine and the Oberndorf commercial action do not have this.
    This type has a longer than normal receiver ring, and a longer than normal cocking piece, with a shorter than normal bolt body, hard to figure where the weight savings come in!
    The Oberndorf commercial action was also available in a small ring version, all other dimensions identical.
    ________________________________________


    Type VII, FN24 and Yugo actions
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.115
    Magazine length: 3.232
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank

    This is the FN M24 action, and the Yugoslavian M48 series. I call this group the Yugoslavian intermediate action. There is also a Type VIIA, FN24 Mexican, see below.
    ________________________________________


    Type VIIA, FN24 Mexican
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.165
    Magazine length: 3.232
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank

    I call the Type VIIA the Mexican large ring action. The only difference between the Type VII and VIIA is the length of the bolt body (0.050 difference).
    ________________________________________


    Type VIII, small ring Mexican
    Action OAL: 8.500
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.620
    Bolt body length: 6.080
    Magazine length: 3.118
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300, small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    The Type VIII has the shortest bolt body in this group. Common models are the Mexican M1910, and M1936. Either one can be found manufactured by FN or Fabrica de Armas in Mexico City.


    bear8mm
    Re: LONG AND SHORT ACTIONS #3
    [-]

    Jul 16 03 10:16 PM
    Now we are into the expensive stuff! The long actions and short actions are commercial only. The long actions are divided into 2 types, the "British" type and the French type. The British type are not necessarily made in England, but are usually chambered for British cartridges, such as the .416 Rigby or .404 Jeffery. The French type is even longer than the British type, but the French type is actually made in France.

    Type IX, British Type, aka M98 long, aka Commercial Magnum
    Action OAL: 9.150
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.835
    Bolt body length: 6.770
    Magazine length: 3.640/3.840
    Recvr ring dia: 1.410, large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.100, large shank
    ________________________________________


    Type X, French Type, aka French Magnum, aka Brevex Magnum
    Action OAL: 9.240
    Recvr screws, center to center: 8.207
    Bolt body length: 6.740
    Magazine length: 3.900
    Recvr ring dia: 1.500, X-large ring
    Barrel shank dia: 1.141, X-large shank.

    Notice that the French magnum is larger in every dimension than the British magnum, but the French bolt is shorter by .030"
    ________________________________________


    Type XI, "True" short action, aka Commercial Kurz
    Action OAL: 8.125
    Recvr screws, center to center: 7.225
    Bolt body length: 5.760
    Magazine length: 2.725
    Recvr ring dia: 1.300, small ring
    Barrel shank dia: .980, small shank

    These are very rare and expensive, and a collector's item on their own. Chambered for short cartridges such as the .250 Savage, they are so hard to come by that they are often made by cutting down a standard Type I M98 action. If you suspect you have one, look for a welded receiver just forward of the thumb cut. Bolts are usually welded just behind the aft end of the guide rib.

  17. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by geladen View Post
    That would explain the rarity of Mexican FN1924 short rifles if 24,000 were ordered but only 5,000 were delivered.

    Anthony, are you seeing this? Jim has somehow acquired a lot of records from Mexico.
    There was a fellow in Mexico city who is/was working on a book of Mexican armament. He supposedly got access to their national archives and provided me with some great period photos and some other data. Regretfully, the files were internet type files and I needed larger files and an authorization / release for publishing the images. He promised and promised to get me what we needed, even when we were in the layout stages, he kept promising this, so we left space for inserting this. When push came to shove, he no longer answered and left us hanging… as a result we had to rework the chapter. It cost me a lot of time and energy and got nothing out of it. He did not have the contract and the numbers he estimated were not accurate.

    I did not see the FN contract but got the numbers from another FN document. Just from my databases, I have rifles spanning in numbers from 1000+ to the 24,000 range. I do not agree that there were only 5,000. We have owned four or five through the years and remember seeing pallets of them at Springfield Sporters (in the 1990s). I think that the challenge is finding a nice original one, with matching numbers. All I have ever seen were sanded, and almost all were in dismal shape (often arsenal blued). SS was also stripping parts and disassembling them, who knows how many were turned in spare parts.

    I have no doubt that all rifles were delivered and issued, just few survive in nice shape.

  18. #17
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    geladen is online now Platinum Bullet Member and Curmudgeon-in-Training
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony Vanderlinden View Post
    There was a fellow in Mexico city who is/was working on a book of Mexican armament. He supposedly got access to their national archives and provided me with some great period photos and some other data. Regretfully, the files were internet type files and I needed larger files and an authorization / release for publishing the images. He promised and promised to get me what we needed, even when we were in the layout stages, he kept promising this, so we left space for inserting this. When push came to shove, he no longer answered and left us hanging… as a result we had to rework the chapter. It cost me a lot of time and energy and got nothing out of it. He did not have the contract and the numbers he estimated were not accurate.

    I did not see the FN contract but got the numbers from another FN document. Just from my databases, I have rifles spanning in numbers from 1000+ to the 24,000 range. I do not agree that there were only 5,000. We have owned four or five through the years and remember seeing pallets of them at Springfield Sporters (in the 1990s). I think that the challenge is finding a nice original one, with matching numbers. All I have ever seen were sanded, and almost all were in dismal shape (often arsenal blued). SS was also stripping parts and disassembling them, who knows how many were turned in spare parts.

    I have no doubt that all rifles were delivered and issued, just few survive in nice shape.
    OK, I'll go with that.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

    Regards,
    Bill


    All my Mausers are here (Index is in post #1):
    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthread.php?144316-Mausers-Only-Mausers

    III, GOA Life





  19. #18
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    Default Back to Mexican Rifle Bolts

    On June 20, 1916 a colonel on the General Staff of First Chief Carranza ordered the National Arms Factory to "make/produce" as quickly as possible the following bolts:
    400 for Spanish Mausers (Model 1893)
    150 for Austrian Mausers (Model 1912)
    50 for Japanese Rifles (Arisaka, 7mm)
    plus various rear sight and other parts. These were to be delivered to General of Division Francisco Murguia in Monclova. My guess that the Director scrounged bolts instead
    of manufacturing them!

  20. #19
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    Jim,

    Would you mind sharing your source with us? I assume it is a primary document of some form?

  21. #20
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    The letter describing the above is the source. It has two archival numbers rubber stamped on it, a very faded 5361 as the original request and another (9674) near the top. In archives in Mexico City.

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