Gewehr 98 restoration
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Thread: Gewehr 98 restoration

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    Post Gewehr 98 restoration

    Hey all; forgive me if this has been asked before, but I'm a young & new to the forum and haven't really learned the ins & outs yet. So here is the question;

    I'm building a Gewehr 98. Trying to put it into original configuration, and what I'm starting with is a stripped receiver, bolt ejector assembly, trigger assembly (both matching to receiver), and complete bolt (not matching to the receiver but matching to itself with imperial markings). I'm thinking of picking up one of the lothar walther barrels in original contour. ANYWAYS, I'm no expert with these rifles, but I know a decent bit about k98's (I have around 10 of them). I want all original parts but was going to get a new made stock from foxmilitary.com. The receiver is a 1917 DWM. No turkish markings. The question is what are the correct parts to get for this rifle? I'll get the roller coaster sights but don't if I should be looking for imperial markings only, how many dimples the action screws should have, and if they should have markings, and then there's whether the butt should have a unit disc, or take down disc assembly.

    Please help! Thanks.

  2. #2
    geladen's Avatar
    geladen is offline Platinum Bullet Member and Curmudgeon-in-Training
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    You would be ahead to just buy a Gewehr 98. Maybe buy one missing the bolt, if you can find one.

    The receiver will make a fine paper weight.
    Every post I make is made with a request for corrections. I'm here to learn.

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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by geladen View Post
    You would be ahead to just buy a Gewehr 98. Maybe buy one missing the bolt, if you can find one.

    The receiver will make a fine paper weight.
    this is very good advice;give it a lot of thought. it would take a while but you could find a Gewehr 98 with incorrect or no bolt at a reasonable price.with the correctly marked bolt that you already have,you would then have something of value. the assembly you have described with modern replacement parts would be expensive to assemble and the end result would be a piece with low value and little demand. Geladen has offered very,very sound advice;you would be wise to consider that.

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  5. #4
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    To me it would come down to how lucky you are in terms of finding decent bits (those sights are delicate and often get smushed a bit during removal) and if you have a skilled Mauser gunsmith in the family who works at prices equal to less than a new lexus.

  6. #5

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    Let's see; you have the receiver, ejector box, complete trigger guard and bolt. You have the beginnings of a complete mix master, perhaps at a reasonable price, but by the time you have purchased a new-made barrel and stock you may have in it close to the price of a matching Gew98. Add to that, you will have to purchase the easy to find parts like bands, band springs, rear and front sight assemblies and butt plate and all screws. Your purchase for parts alone will be pretty high, as I said above, possibly higher than the cost of an original. Then you will have the cost of having the barrel installed and other minor assembly work (sight installation, etc.) and stocking which, depending on your experience and abilities can cost a fair chunk of change if done correctly. After all of that, the parts must be polished and properly finished. By the time everything is done you will have a complete miss-match at a high price.

    Best to follow advice given by those above. Find a matching rifle in reasonable condition and it will probably at a lower price than you will have in time and money. You will have an investment that will grow in value.

  7. #6
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    Excellent input given so far. Where are you located? The only crux would be if you are located somewhere that Gew's are not readily available.

    Rebuilding a Gew is not really worth it unless a rare/uncommon one. I have one I am in the middle of rebuilding and cannot recommend it to anyone.

    The only input I would add, sell the 1917 action to me, I don't have a 1917 paper weight yet

  8. #7
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    All of the above is great advice. Originality is the baseline, with condition as an additive, when it comes to collecting. Restorations (unless you have a stash of all of the required parts) will be like custom work - you will never recover the money that you put into it. If I put a $500 Krieger barrel on a pre-64 Mod 70, it will be worth less than with the original - even shot out - $35 barrel on it. The Lothar Walther is a wonderful barrel - much better than a brand new original, but it's money gone. If you know this going in, and want a rifle to shoot, have a ball. A 1917 Gew 98 would likely have a beech stock with a take-down. The small parts will mostly be numbered, with imperial eagles. On my 1913 Spandau, the capture screws, rear swivel, swivel screws, and band retainers are unnumbered (this may not be correct, however). The action screws have 3 cutouts. I am not sure about the foxmilitary.com stocks, but if they are from the same source as the newly-made ones from Numrich and Brownells, they are very soft, so be careful. Since yours will not be correct, anyway, I would consider modifying a contract Mauser stock. I believe that a member still has a 1908 Brazilian set still available. Also, a S/42 rear sight is much better than the old Lange sight, and would give your rifle a Gew 98M look. This approach allows for a 100 yd sight-in, or the use of Kar 98k scout scope mounts and Mojo sights.

  9. #8
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    Well I appreciate all the input but cost isn't an issue on this one. Mausers are my hobby so I'm not looking at saving money with them. Really what I do is buying a receiver and build it with correct parts from the ground up. I always put a new lothar walther barrel on and have it accurized by my mauser specialist while still retaining as much originality as possible. I collect in the sense of correct parts but not serial numbers. I'd rather have a correct mauser with good condition parts I hand selected, and don't feel bad shooting out an original barrel. I have one fully matching k98 but I'm not crazy about it cause I never want to take it to the shooting range. The others are accurized so I take them out often and if I bump the new stock I don't loose sleep over it. So in a nutshell, I'm well aware that I'm taking the least cost-effective route. I'm just not very experienced with Gew 98s though I know a good bit about k98's. I'm wondering what the correct pieces are for this build.

  10. #9
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    I've put more than one Mausrt together for the fun of it! So my advice is: Get a good book on Mausers and look at the photos. there is good, bad and indifferent info on the web, so check the sites, including the auction sites for photos and info. I've put together several good scrapbooks doing just that. One thing: The Germans NEVER dimpled action screws! I've only seen that on some Turk and some 3rd World Mausers. My guess is this was done to hinder their "recruits" from unauthorized knobdicking!

  11. #10
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    Maybe dimples was the wrong word - but the cuts/inlets on the head of the screw that the locking screws fit into. Not sure what the correct term is for those. I've just seem some gew 98's with one inlet on the screws, with imperial markings & serial numbers. While others have 3 inlets and no markings whatsoever.

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