I had to give it the once over
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Thread: I had to give it the once over

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Northern Kali
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    162

    wink2 I had to give it the once over

    Hi Fellow C&R Junkies,

    Quite some time ago, I picked up this Stevens 325 with a group of rifles and parts from an estate. I really had no idea what the heck they were, and never knew there was such a thing as a .30-30 bolt gun. The stock was in very poor condition, the gas shield clips were bent (which had the bolt jammed), and of course it had never been cleaned. I was able to persuade the bolt out, and save the mechanicals.

    I often wonder how people could treat ANY civilian fire arm so badly. The wood had dents, gouges, and deep scratches. It took quite a bit of sanding and steam, and then I just had to say it was as good as it was gonna get.

    Last week, while LGS dumpster diving, I found a recoil pad that would be a close enough fit, with a little trim off the butt and pad both, and a nice era correct basket weave sling. I added the swivels.

    Some Old English and syth oil on the furniture, a splash of olive oil on the dried up sling, and viola, good loner gun or first time center fire shooter rifle.
    The final item needing addressed is the rear sight. It has a crack that needs braised. Came with an extra mag, and the pointy boolits I picked up garage sailing.
    I know I've committed a mortal C&R sin with sanding and saw, but it lives to kill again.

    PS, for all you guys still snowed in, these picts were taken this morning after I mowed the lawn. PAX



    You need a crew

  2. #2
    Clyde's Avatar
    Clyde is online now Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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    Dec 1969
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    East Texas
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    Lots of bolt-gun 30-30s over the years. Savage, Rem 788, etc.. Make good woods guns or truck guns (probably how it got beat up). That one wasn't a collector gun when you got it (and wouldn't have been of much interest to most if it had been NIB...), so what you did is no sin.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    777

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    Funny,but buyers were once horrified by the pressed steel triggerguard,now they are happy with misshapen blobs of plastic.Regards John.

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  5. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    1,093

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    If you hand load you can get a bit more out of the 30-30 in a bolt rifle.Larger bullet choice in Spitzers.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Oceanside, California
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    Default 30-30 Bolt Rifles, an interesting breed!

    Not quite sure why, but I’m a fan of the bolt action 30-30 rifle genre. The postwar series of Savage/Stevens rifles in 30-30 as here in your particular Model 325 Stevens, bringing good, reliable postwar high power centerfire rifles to ‘the masses’! Also champ in the category of production longevity as well (’47 – ’84). Such rifles under various sub-models and marketing names, yet as the last major American gunmakers to offer 30-30 bolt action chambering . Its competitors such as Remington model 788 30-30 bolt production, only three years (’77 - ’80). Predecessor, Winchester Model 54 four years (’27 – ’30) and Savage Models 40 & 45, latter adorned “Super Sporter”, a dozen years(’28 – ’40). Such though relative scant production.

    All in marketing context ‘quirky’, yet interesting’ 30-30 bolt rifles. Considering the general production run, your basic rifle design had to represent a lot ‘right’ about these models. Contributing heavily of course, price point. Achieving the same results as the pricey, big name manufacturers. For such as Winchester in its Model 54 era, competing against itself in the highly successful Model 94 likely the decision not to take it into the “NRA” sporter sub-model era. Prewar Savages 40 & 45 Models, terminating with the war effort ramping up. Postwar, your rifle type, the ‘little engine that could’ and for many years, the only effort of its sort on the block! Remington’s attempt in the 788, basically a ‘noble experiment’; a happier term for market miscalculation. But that little engine likely a much more attractive price point for basically the same result. The 788 doing far better in the ‘nouveau’ chamberings.

    At the end of this road, the 30-30 chambering itself as one of the most proliferate and affordable factory centerfire rounds to be had Stateside. For many of us, that alone offering any gun chambering it, a special attraction.
    And so... Congratulations on your rifle and nice restoration effort results! That pad installation looking superior to many contemporary factory builds!
    My take

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Northern Kali
    Posts
    162

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    Thanks iskra, I'm actually liking it a lot. You know how it is when you get after a little project like this, it become your favorite for the time being. Today I picked up a Marbles buck horn dove tail that I believe I can persuade to fit. It'll make a great sight swap for the cracked one that's on it, and I can quit contemplating D&T for a peep, unless I stumble onto the correct Lyman. I'm kinda reluctant to do something irreversible to a first run gun, even if it's really not that valuable. From everything I'm hearing, it should really be a good meat getter, especially with spire boolits, at the ranges encountered in Kali. I'm thinking I'm going to substitute it for my scoped Savage 99 in .308, for the final lead year this season. It has cleaned up enough that I won't be ashamed to use it as a loner gun, or a transitional trainer from .22 to center fire, for the youngsters or the ladies, hence the recoil pad. PAX
    You need a crew

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Manitoba,Canada
    Posts
    301

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    very good job to make an oldie look good again. wish i could get the same treatment somewhere,cheers.

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