Reichsluftfahrtministerium - RLM
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Thread: Reichsluftfahrtministerium - RLM

  1. #1

    Default Reichsluftfahrtministerium - RLM

    Hi,

    I know much has been written on this forum on the use of RLM-marked bayonets in the mid 1930's. However, I've added a new 98/05 to my collection and it's neatly stamped "RLM 1523" on the reverse crossguard.

    I bought it in bad condition, and cleaned it. Sadly, most of the blueing had already been removed at some point.

    It does have nice matching markings on the tang below the grips, the press-stud mechanism and the Feuerschützblech. In fact, it has TWO sets of matching numbers :-) This tells me it has been reworked twice(?)

    RLM markings seem to be found on various places of the bayonet. I assume this has to do with a lack of regulation at the time. Is it known at what point in time 4- or 5-digit serial numbers were in use? I've seen bayonets solely marked "RLM" without any serial numbers aswell.

    Any thoughts...?

    Here are some before and after pictures:

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  2. #2
    Join Date
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    I have a Berlin pocket watch timer (stop watch) in my collection with RLM on the back. No bayonets with that marking.

  3. #3
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    Nice job removing the rust but not going too far with the cleaning. You took it to the line but didn't step over, IMHO....

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris1981 View Post
    ... It does have nice matching markings on the tang below the grips, the press-stud mechanism and the Feuerschützblech. In fact, it has TWO sets of matching numbers :-) This tells me it has been reworked twice(?) ...
    Yes, one set will be the original, and the second the re-working for re-issue. What is interesting, though, is that they kept the original non-slotted push-button for the bayonet catch.

    Can't help with the serial numbers, I'm afraid, or when RLM started marking their bayonets.

    Note, incidentally, this is a 'bent-back' 98/05... I have seen a few of these in which the blade spine is at a slight downward angle to the tang. When I first saw one like this I thought it was due to damage, but it does seem to be something associated with the manufacturing process. Does this one of yours have a spine mark? Should be 1915 or later, I think.

    Oh, yes, and a nice job of cleaning - but as Stede says, no further!

    Trajan

  6. #5
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    It was reworked probably only once for the RLM using in late 30ies, other assembly numbers are from production line. As the piece has no 1920 stamp, it was most probably hidden from Allied comission in depots. b.r.Andy

  7. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stede View Post
    Nice job removing the rust but not going too far with the cleaning. You took it to the line but didn't step over, IMHO....
    Hi, Exactly. It's a very thin line though, and not every piece can be restored to a point where the results are acceptable. I only buy bayonets of which the washers and bolts aren't coroded together so I can slowly attempt to remove them. Any active rust should always be removed to stop it from coroding any further. Black pitting can also be removed, but I never take it that far.

  8. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trajan View Post
    Note, incidentally, this is a 'bent-back' 98/05... I have seen a few of these in which the blade spine is at a slight downward angle to the tang. When I first saw one like this I thought it was due to damage, but it does seem to be something associated with the manufacturing process. Does this one of yours have a spine mark? Should be 1915 or later, I think.
    That's interesting, I've never noticed it before. On a 98/05 model, the blade spine is always at a slight downward angle to the tang - no? Or do you mean the blade spine is not 100% straight, but somewhat bent / concave?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    You are correct on the date, it's a Prussian 1915. Still visible beneath the blueing.

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    Last edited by Kris1981; 03-21-2017 at 11:18 AM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by AndyB View Post
    It was reworked probably only once for the RLM using in late 30ies, other assembly numbers are from production line. As the piece has no 1920 stamp, it was most probably hidden from Allied comission in depots. b.r.Andy
    Based on the font I'm guessing the '32' dates back to Imperial times and was stamped during initial production, while the '631' was stamped in the 30's.

  10. #9
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    It could be so, what for serials are on grips? b.r.Andy

  11. #10

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    None. There's nothing on the back of the grips. No pensil marks, no stamps. Usually, there's something there most of the time. But not in this case.

  12. #11
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    My example has a Fraktur inspection mark on the scabbard's ball finial, flanked by a 3 and 6. Always wondered whether the numbers may have been added to signify the year (1936) that it was taken into RLM service.

    http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Ide...1945.html#9805
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  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kris1981 View Post
    That's interesting, I've never noticed it before. On a 98/05 model, the blade spine is always at a slight downward angle to the tang - no? Or do you mean the blade spine is not 100% straight, but somewhat bent / concave?

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Yes. the original specification allows for a slight downward angle - 1.4 mm at the mid-way point along the blade. But many seem to have a much steeper angle. Probably just manufacturer's individual variations...

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by marysdad View Post
    My example has a Fraktur inspection mark on the scabbard's ball finial, flanked by a 3 and 6. Always wondered whether the numbers may have been added to signify the year (1936) that it was taken into RLM service.

    http://worldbayonets.com/Bayonet_Ide...1945.html#9805
    Very nice Schutzpolizei piece! The "36" might just be a serial number, I've seen similar ones with the matching mark on the throat of the scabbard. But never flanking an earlier Fraktur :-)

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by trajan View Post
    Yes. the original specification allows for a slight downward angle - 1.4 mm at the mid-way point along the blade. But many seem to have a much steeper angle. Probably just manufacturer's individual variations...
    Seems correct. Much like the differences noticed in the thickness/width of the crossguard, variations do exist. Up until now, I've only measured the length and weight of my bayonets. Maybe I'll expand the data ;-)

    PS: for some reason, the heaviest pieces are made by Waffenfabrik Mauser - Oberndorf. But I'm concluding this on the data of about 30 pieces, so let's not draw any conclusions...

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