Pro's and cons of making a replica sniper?
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Thread: Pro's and cons of making a replica sniper?

  1. #1
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    Default Pro's and cons of making a replica sniper?

    I have a 1943 Izhevsk M91/30. Nothing too special, although it's all-matching with a pristine bore and smooth (for a Mosin) action. Overall quite a nice gun, if not much of a looker. The only problem is, my eyes aren't really good enough for long-range shooting with iron sights, even with glasses. I'd kind of like to turn it into a replica sniper, which would also allow me to use an adapter to use modern scopes. I know I could do a scout scope mount that wouldn't modify the action (although the set screws used do tend to wreck the finish), but those are also limited in magnification.

    So what are your thoughts on such a modification? I wouldn't be doing a bubba job, and I'd also be letting the rifle reach its full potential.

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    I've wondered the same, using an ex sniper, retap the filled holes and fit with repo mount...gonna follow this...


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    Just sell it and buy a refurbished PU sniper.
    Looking for Mosin 91/30 bayonet ГС4625. Will pay well!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bp2626 View Post
    Just sell it and buy a refurbished PU sniper.

    This is likely the more economical choice in the long run.

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    Considering that (1) I already have the gun (which I only paid $75 for years ago), and (2) its bore is in mint condition, swapping it out doesn't make sense. Furthermore, BP's response is rather rude.

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    First, many collectors object to permanently changing any historic rifle. You are starting with a fairly common one, plus as we say "it's your rifle," but still, a bit of history is altered, so prepare for some flak here on the project. The "Workbench" is easier on you, but I will try to help.

    I have done several re-scopings of existing Tula ex-snipers with good results. I haven't and wouldn't build a replica on an existing non-PU as it never was one. There are a number of earlier posts on it if you search. I don't even shoot the rescoped ones much as I have a real 43 Tula PU that does sub-MOA when my eyes are up to it.

    Basically you end up with a "sum-of-the-parts" value if you want to sell it, meaning you start with your rifle cost, add a base and mount ($150+), add a scope (about $250 shipped for a real PU) and add a lot of sweat time, burned out drill bits ($50) and stock work for the base fit. Also, a turned down bolt handle job is generally $50 done on your bolt. That brings you to maybe $575 in the project, enough to buy an existing replica sniper if you look hard. That assumes you would sell your base rifle for just $75 ( it is worth perhaps $200+ easily). That total cost is why a fellow member suggested you consider selling your rifle to buy what you want.

    Drilling and tapping an ex-sniper is tough as the holes are filled with super-hard crystallized weld. If you have a good heavy drill press and the skill to do it, after you drill you must tap, a frustrating job sometimes as you can easily break a tap in the hard weld. I use a diamond bit for a small hole followed by a correct size carbide bit and lots of machine oil as I drill.

    You can then put on the base and align the mount, sometimes needing shimming.

    I am not familiar with any PU mount that lets you put on a modern scope except for a long-extinct SKS too-high mount that fits a PU base. I tried one once with a 3X9 Leupold in it and it made no difference at all in my group size at 100 yards over a real PU scope.

    A real PU sniper can cost about $700 if you find it. The Big Five replicas used to cost $499 and even those are often more these days.

    I wouldn't do a PU rescope again as now it costs too much, but even replica snipers are no longer cheap. I have done successfully both top-mount PEs and sidemount PEMS, the latter with authentic PEM scopes, as these are not something I will probably ever be able to find.

    I think you can do it if you are a decent machinist and own the drill press, but the idea of running a modern scope on it is against my grain. Make a PU if you will, but don't try to make it something it never was.

    Why not just buy a modern low-end Remington or Mossberg or Savage for about the same money as rescoping if you want modern capabilities? I bought my son one of the new Remingtons complete with 3X9 scope for under $300 right here on GB and it shoots 7/8 MOA in .270. Not as fancy and slick as my custom 700s, but as accurate and very inexpensive.
    Last edited by Stalin's Ghost; 04-13-2017 at 11:26 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    Considering that (1) I already have the gun (which I only paid $75 for years ago), and (2) its bore is in mint condition, swapping it out doesn't make sense. Furthermore, BP's response is rather rude.
    First, I see nothing at all rude about bp2626's response: you did ask for the thoughts of the group regarding the modification, and there was nothing abusive about his response.

    Anyway, my thoughts (with which some here will disagree): If I were going to add a scope to any Mosin, it would be an ex-PU. While a rescoped ex is a compromised piece historically speaking, at least it's "restored" to its original intended configuration, while a regular infantry rifle "converted" to a PU is simply a repro.

    Lots of gray areas here. To me, the only good reason to rescope an ex-PU is if you are a frequent shooter and are trying to save wear and tear on original PUs. The economic considerations depend on how much work you are able to do yourself and how much you will be charged for the parts you can't.

    And back to bp2626's point, the fact that you bought the rifle for $75 doesn't mean it's a $75 rifle now, and the current resale value must be factored into any assessment of the economics of making a repro vs. buying something already configured as what you need.







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ID:	2136674I know this is Mosin forum , but here is a 1903 A4 semi clone I put together from a salvaged drill rifle receiver for around $600. Easily shoots 1 inch groups @ 100 yds. Almost every project I take on I have to do low budget as I am disabled and on Social Security. Not trying to hijack your thread but if you are able to do some of the work yourself its doable. It's your gun, so have fun with it !!

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    There's a matching 1944 PU for sale on the Trader section right now. For what it's worth seller is a very reputable collector and seems open to negotiation on price.

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    Ghost and Relic summed up my entire experience re scoping a 91/30 into a clone PU sniper. Granted my rifle had been a Ex PU but the fact is...by the time you get it all done, you've spent as much as the
    cost of a replica or a real PU.

    There is but one reason I did it in the first place: save my original PU from hard use and I do shoot a lot. It was not done as a cheap solution to gain a PU sniper for competition ...it was not cheap to restore this Ex PU, it cost but $50 less than a real PU....

    My solution for the OP is to sell his current rifle and get a Ex PU already restored or a real PU. If that is not an option, sell his current rifle and go get a scoped Savage 308 from Walmart ...thats about $450 out the door and easy on wallet for ammo, for rifle & scope and performance will meet or exceed a WWII PU.

    However, that is experience offered and in no way can it dissuade a man who is on a "Yes I Can" event.

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    I think that this is worth saying here at some point: You really don't say whether or not the rifle is accurate as it sits right now. After all that expense, you may be disappointed at the results. Sniper rifles were chosen because of their inherent accuracy. Putting a scope on an inaccurate rifle will not improve it's accuracy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Buckstopper View Post
    I think that this is worth saying here at some point: You really don't say whether or not the rifle is accurate as it sits right now. After all that expense, you may be disappointed at the results. Sniper rifles were chosen because of their inherent accuracy. Putting a scope on an inaccurate rifle will not improve it's accuracy.
    Technically, PUs were purpose-produced to be snipers from the get-go.







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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    I have a 1943 Izhevsk M91/30. Nothing too special, although it's all-matching with a pristine bore and smooth (for a Mosin) action. Overall quite a nice gun, if not much of a looker. The only problem is, my eyes aren't really good enough for long-range shooting with iron sights, even with glasses. I'd kind of like to turn it into a replica sniper, which would also allow me to use an adapter to use modern scopes. I know I could do a scout scope mount that wouldn't modify the action (although the set screws used do tend to wreck the finish), but those are also limited in magnification.

    So what are your thoughts on such a modification? I wouldn't be doing a bubba job, and I'd also be letting the rifle reach its full potential.
    You are bubbaing anything you make into something it wasn't when you got it period! Plus if you have been reading on here for any amount of time you will see posts of people down the line after you sold it who bought it thinking it was real and paid accordingly. Now they are stuck with something they will never be able to get their money out of and a bad taste by your handiwork just so you could feed your ego and prove that you could do it. Don't start with the but I would never do that because you aren't going to be the one to wrongly pass it off. You are going to start the problem creating the rifle and somebody very unscrupulous will pass it off as something it is not and screw a new collector or somebody who doesn't know any better.

    Save you money and buy a real one!! I am so sick and tired of beating this drum about what has been happening over and over it makes me sick to think people don't just read about this and know enough to not even ask or think about it. Yes it is your gun but dang it you don't own the history so stop screwing with it and screwing the buyers of your gun creation down the line! Bill
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    Hey Wolf, You don't need to drill and tap or alter that nice rifle in a permanent way to get an easier set up for your eyes.

    LadyLuck last year took a 39 Tula, removed the rear ladder sight, and installed a "scout mount" and a long eye relief pistol scope on her rifle. Anytime she wants to she could return the rifle to it's original setup.

    I did the same to my daughter's 43 Izhevsk M91/30. It worked out real well. You can read about the process and see the results on this thread if you care to. http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...-casual-sniper
    Last edited by Montana Bearbait; 04-13-2017 at 11:48 PM. Reason: clarifaction

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    Some really good advice in this thread already. I'd just echo a couple others in that a scout sniper would be the most economical, less damaging and easiest to do. Simply find a rear sight replacement mount and have fun. When you go to sell it, put the old rear sight back on. Should not require any permanent modification to the rifle.

    There are reproduction PUs and yes PE and PEMs out there but they seem to have gone up in price in the past two years so if you're dead set on historically accurate, I'd find a legitimate PU import to buy for under $1000. You could also find an old samco scopeless PU and add your own base/mount/optics to save a couple bucks.
    Jack of all milsurps, master of none.

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    OP,

    To flip this a bit. For the cost of $400 or so you can get a Swiss K31, and for maybe another $400 to $450 get a mount and scope. The mount from Swiss Products is a clamp on mount so no perm mod done to gun. Thing will shoot out to 1000yds no problem. I personally would go this route...

    The scope I would use is a SWFA Super Sniper scope. I've attached the link:

    https://swfa.com/swfa-ss-16x42-tacti...lescope-1.html

    This scope is $300. Before you sneer at the price, everyone I know that uses one, LOVES THEM!!!!!! How good are they??? Many people in our club use these for shooting out to 1000 yards at Marine Corps Base Quantico. I have two and will add another one at some future date... Great warranty too, should something happen to the scope. Japanese made...
    Looking for USS Casimir Pulaski SSBN 633 items.

    This was the most interesting conversation I was ever not a part of and I look forward to the next conversation on the topic.
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    Why NOT buy one of the PW Arms PU sniper clones that they sold a few years ago that you can still find for sale?

    Based upon the one I bought and two others I inspected VERY closely back in the day (and then accurized. Don't miss this month's group buy.), they used pretty doggone solid rifles with VERY good bores to build them, and all the necessary work is already done (including the bolt). They usually still go for reasonably cheap, and you can probably beat the price of scoping up an ex-sniper (question: What major reason(s) can you come up with as to why they might be EX snipers now?) by going this route.

    Besides, all the Bubbaing has ALREADY been done to these clones. You run no risk of ruining one.

    Of course, the biggest downside with ANY PU sniper is either you need to have a face as long as a horse's (or find a cheekpiece that fits) to get any sort of a decent cheek weld, but you probably already knew that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronbo6 View Post

    Of course, the biggest downside with ANY PU sniper is either you need to have a face as long as a horse's (or find a cheekpiece that fits) to get any sort of a decent cheek weld, but you probably already knew that.
    That's why I'd get one of these beauties: http://www.czechmauseritis.com/leath...4-2011_013.htm

    Thing is, I've got a good rifle already. I don't want to sell it. Doing a correct conversion isn't really a bubba job, and it's not like I intend to sell it to someone with no disclosure. I just don't have the cash to drop on a real sniper right now, and won't for the foreseeable future. This particular Mosin has a lot of potential, and I want to see it reached. The scout scope doesn't appeal to me, either, due to its limited magnification (never seen one over 2-7x). So it's either convert it to a historically correct configuration that works for me or to something that won't really do what I want.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post

    The scout scope doesn't appeal to me, either, due to its limited magnification (never seen one over 2-7x). So it's either convert it to a historically correct configuration that works for me or to something that won't really do what I want.
    Ah, pardon me, wolf, but I'm having trouble understanding that last sentence.
    See the "historically correct" magnification, if you're thinking of a PU scope, is only 3.5, so your scout scope you mentioned is twice as powerful as the PU ... Now, don't get upset with me, I'm really trying to be positive here.

    We have a "real McCoy" PU here and my daughter's scout scope setup that I told you about. I've shot both. Truth be told, the scout is a lot easier, and quicker to get on target, than the PU. Plus, the scout is way faster and easier to reload. For the money, the scout setup was less than half that of the PU.

    One more question, what do you need, or want, your '43 scoped for? If it's fun target shooting, I assure you the scout scope setup will fill that need. It will also work as a hunting rifle. That's originally why we got that rifle for our daughter. So maybe you might reconsider?

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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    Considering that (1) I already have the gun (which I only paid $75 for years ago), and (2) its bore is in mint condition, swapping it out doesn't make sense. Furthermore, BP's response is rather rude.
    If you thought BP's response was rude I'll spare you the emotional distress of learning where I stand on replicas and fake snipers.
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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    That's why I'd get one of these beauties: http://www.czechmauseritis.com/leath...4-2011_013.htm

    Thing is, I've got a good rifle already. I don't want to sell it. Doing a correct conversion isn't really a bubba job, and it's not like I intend to sell it to someone with no disclosure. I just don't have the cash to drop on a real sniper right now, and won't for the foreseeable future.
    You need the scope, scope base, scope mount, a gunsmith to correctly mount everything together, bolt conversion and stock conversion. Have you priced all of this out?

    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    This particular Mosin has a lot of potential, and I want to see it reached.
    You don't say if the rifle shoots well enough to benefit from dropping all that time, effort and money. Just because it has a "mint" bore doesn't mean it's an exceptional or even a good shooter. If that were the case, it would've been a sniper.

    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    The scout scope doesn't appeal to me, either, due to its limited magnification (never seen one over 2-7x).
    You realize a "correct" version uses a 3.5x magnification, right?

    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    So it's either convert it to a historically correct configuration that works for me or to something that won't really do what I want.
    So, if you want it "correct" it's a low power scope you stated you didn't want. If you put any other scope on a permeant mount it's a bubba job.

    It's your money and your rifle, good luck.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jwrauch View Post
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ID:	2136674I know this is Mosin forum , but here is a 1903 A4 semi clone I put together from a salvaged drill rifle receiver for around $600. Easily shoots 1 inch groups @ 100 yds. Almost every project I take on I have to do low budget as I am disabled and on Social Security. Not trying to hijack your thread but if you are able to do some of the work yourself its doable. It's your gun, so have fun with it !!
    Cool, I like it... Hey, next time you get the chance to, could you post some pictures of your targets? Seeing nice tight groups always helps to motivate me, Thanks in advance!
    Last edited by Montana Bearbait; 04-13-2017 at 11:54 PM. Reason: grammer

  24. #23
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    sick

    The PU is a 3.5 power scope and you work hard at 1000 yds to use it. Way easier than my 2.5 power WWII optic on my 03a4 Gibbs replica sniper rifle...the 2.5 is really tough to use at 1000 yds .

    I say all this because if you can mount a 2-7 x on a scout mount atop a 91/30 rifle, you are way better off for long range shooting than using a PU scope.

    If you are shooting under 600 yds, the 2-7x optic is pure joy to use.

    Do I know if a 2-7x variable can go 600....well, it does easily that on my K31 Swiss carbine and that rifle on 1000 yd line shot its worst group ..12 inches. Its shot smaller groups too but on average 12 is most frequent so I report only that.

    Thus...any rationale that a 2-7 won't work for a 91/30 ...it does not have merit. They will do the job.

    I said this before and I say it again "However, that is experience offered and in no way can it dissuade a man who is on a "Yes I Can" event."

    It does appear the OP is bent on an agenda and facts only get in the way .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Montana Bearbait View Post
    Ah, pardon me, wolf, but I'm having trouble understanding that last sentence.
    See the "historically correct" magnification, if you're thinking of a PU scope, is only 3.5, so your scout scope you mentioned is twice as powerful as the PU ... Now, don't get upset with me, I'm really trying to be positive here.

    We have a "real McCoy" PU here and my daughter's scout scope setup that I told you about. I've shot both. Truth be told, the scout is a lot easier, and quicker to get on target, than the PU. Plus, the scout is way faster and easier to reload. For the money, the scout setup was less than half that of the PU.

    One more question, what do you need, or want, your '43 scoped for? If it's fun target shooting, I assure you the scout scope setup will fill that need. It will also work as a hunting rifle. That's originally why we got that rifle for our daughter. So maybe you might reconsider?
    Here's the deal: Kalinka makes an adapter that fits on the PU side rail that lets you put Weaver rings on it. So I could easily swap between a modern scope and a historically accurate one. If I wanted a a 4-12 power scope, I could have one. If I felt like shooting with a PU scope, It's a quick swap. I'd have the advantage of a rifle that could take full-power modern optics without being in a bubba'd configuration.

    If I REALLY wanted, I could probably stick a 1.5-4x scope in the original rings. The PU scopes have a diameter of 26.4mm. 1" is, of course, 25.4mm. There's low-powered modern scopes that only attach at the front; most are 30mm, but there's a few 1" ones available. At most I'd need a small shim to make the rings compatible.

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    Well I learn something every day here, thank you. I did not know about the Kalinka adapters.

    Good Luck to you, what ever you work out!

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    OP, you're going to have two scopes and corresponding mounts? I'm confused, I thought cost was/is an issue.

    How much do you think this conversion is going to cost you? How much are you going to spend on modern glass?

    I'm willing to bet that total cost is going to be close to the cost of a real sniper.

    One more question, how does this rifle shoot?
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    I'm looking at total options. The rifle shoots very well. The pristine barrel has been full-length corked under the upper handguard due to the wood shrinking with age.

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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    I'm looking at total options. The rifle shoots very well. The pristine barrel has been full-length corked under the upper handguard due to the wood shrinking with age.
    Well I'd doubt that this setup would bust your budget. http://www.ebay.com/itm/MOSIN-NAGANT...MAAOSwPhdVP9hm and it wouldn't ruin the rifle either.

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    Personally, I do not see a lot of "pros" to building replicas of historic firearms, from either a monetary nor a historic perspective. You will, in the process destroy a piece of history, so that is certainly a "con" in my world.

    If you need to shoot for bragging rights, buy a modern weapon and tweak it to your heart's desire. After hunting seasons, good bolt action rifles, capable of superior accuracy, are plentiful and cheap. Sell the historic rifle to someone to finance the biggest part of the deal.
    Aut Pax Aut Bellum

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    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    That's why I'd get one of these beauties: http://www.czechmauseritis.com/leath...4-2011_013.htm

    Thing is, I've got a good rifle already. I don't want to sell it. Doing a correct conversion isn't really a bubba job, and it's not like I intend to sell it to someone with no disclosure. I just don't have the cash to drop on a real sniper right now, and won't for the foreseeable future. This particular Mosin has a lot of potential, and I want to see it reached. The scout scope doesn't appeal to me, either, due to its limited magnification (never seen one over 2-7x). So it's either convert it to a historically correct configuration that works for me or to something that won't really do what I want.
    WardenWolf you are relatively new here so you won't realize or accept the fact that all your arguments are duplicates of what we have seen from all knowing relatively new people in the past and will likely learn the tough lessons we are trying to let you know without experiencing them. You have a rifle you are intent on Bubbaing regardless of what you choose to call it and many knowledgeable people have tried to dissuade with patient and logical arguments so frankly we have reached a point where you not going to listen and are repeating the same old useless points we have heard in years past by others. So my thought is go do your bubba job and find out the hard way farther down the road we were right. Oh by the way I too did this many years ago and eventually welded the holes up and sold the rifle that way so in parting it out I could recoup some of my money. I was lucky in the fact that time at least made the parts I used worth more when I went to sell them. How did it shoot? not as good as the real ones I owned so I wasted time money and effort but you don't want to hear that so go waste a grand like I did in the long run. So much advice out there try and learn to take advantage of that before you are too old to do anything about it.

    I am 73 today and boy did I ever miss out on some great chances in my life! Do yourself a favor don't you do that! Bill
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeebill View Post
    WardenWolf you are relatively new here so you won't realize or accept the fact that all your arguments are duplicates of what we have seen from all knowing relatively new people in the past and will likely learn the tough lessons we are trying to let you know without experiencing them. You have a rifle you are intent on Bubbaing regardless of what you choose to call it and many knowledgeable people have tried to dissuade with patient and logical arguments so frankly we have reached a point where you not going to listen and are repeating the same old useless points we have heard in years past by others. So my thought is go do your bubba job and find out the hard way farther down the road we were right. Oh by the way I too did this many years ago and eventually welded the holes up and sold the rifle that way so in parting it out I could recoup some of my money. I was lucky in the fact that time at least made the parts I used worth more when I went to sell them. How did it shoot? not as good as the real ones I owned so I wasted time money and effort but you don't want to hear that so go waste a grand like I did in the long run. So much advice out there try and learn to take advantage of that before you are too old to do anything about it.

    I am 73 today and boy did I ever miss out on some great chances in my life! Do yourself a favor don't you do that! Bill
    OP:

    Please do your self a favor and pay attention to Bill. He speaks the truth.

    PS: Happy Birthday Z-Bill
    Purists of the world, unite!

    “If ye love wealth better than liberty, the tranquility of servitude better than the animating contest of freedom, go home from us in peace. We ask not your counsels or arms. Crouch down and lick the hands which feed you. May your chains set lightly upon you, and may posterity forget that ye were our countrymen.”
    Samuel Adams

  33. #32
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    8,920

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    Happy Birthday, Bill! And thanks again for your irreplaceable help with my 1907 carbine stock! You are the man!

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard in NY* View Post
    OP:

    Please do your self a favor and pay attention to Bill. He speaks the truth.

    PS: Happy Birthday Z-Bill

  34. #33
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Northwest Ohio, about five miles from Lake Erie
    Posts
    8,528

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    Lesson in alternative economics:

    You can very probably sell that rifle you paid $75 for back in the day for something well over $200 at today's prices and put that money towards one of the 91-30 clones that I mentioned earlier, which you can get for something around maybe $600.

    Based upon my experience, that PU clone will have a barrel every bit as good as yours, and it is an even bet that it will shoot as well as (or better than) the rifle you now have.

    For that $400 net cost(+/-), you have the base already installed on the receiver, a recently built reproduction of the PU scope and mount (they are NOT bad scopes at all, as it turns out), and the turned-down bolt is already done. What would that cost you to purchase and have that 'gunsmithing work' done to YOUR rifle? (hint: I bet it is going to be a LOT more than $400).

    You MIGHT need to shim and barrel wrap the rifle, and work on the trigger, which are usually pretty easy do-it-yourself jobs. You would very likely need to do those to your rifle anyway.

    All you need do now is buy your super scope and mount. AGAIN, money you would need to put out in either case, and no different if you bought it for your old rifle or the clone.

    If you are hellbent on Bubbaing the rifle you already have, this won't mean anything to you, but you CAN NOT say it is going to cost you less to do it YOUR way.

  35. #34
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    999

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    Quote Originally Posted by zeebill View Post
    WardenWolf you are relatively new here so you won't realize or accept the fact that all your arguments are duplicates of what we have seen from all knowing relatively new people in the past and will likely learn the tough lessons we are trying to let you know without experiencing them. You have a rifle you are intent on Bubbaing regardless of what you choose to call it and many knowledgeable people have tried to dissuade with patient and logical arguments so frankly we have reached a point where you not going to listen and are repeating the same old useless points we have heard in years past by others. So my thought is go do your bubba job and find out the hard way farther down the road we were right. Oh by the way I too did this many years ago and eventually welded the holes up and sold the rifle that way so in parting it out I could recoup some of my money. I was lucky in the fact that time at least made the parts I used worth more when I went to sell them. How did it shoot? not as good as the real ones I owned so I wasted time money and effort but you don't want to hear that so go waste a grand like I did in the long run. So much advice out there try and learn to take advantage of that before you are too old to do anything about it.

    I am 73 today and boy did I ever miss out on some great chances in my life! Do yourself a favor don't you do that! Bill
    Yah me too, I had to learn the hard way, and have the broken/healed bones to prove it.

    Happy birthday Zee!

    Wolf, wise Zeebill is, in the ways of the Mosin. Listen to him, you should.

  36. #35
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    999

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ronbo6 View Post
    Lesson in alternative economics:

    You can very probably sell that rifle you paid $75 for back in the day for something well over $200 at today's prices and put that money towards one of the 91-30 clones that I mentioned earlier, which you can get for something around maybe $600.

    Based upon my experience, that PU clone will have a barrel every bit as good as yours, and it is an even bet that it will shoot as well as (or better than) the rifle you now have.

    For that $400 net cost(+/-), you have the base already installed on the receiver, a recently built reproduction of the PU scope and mount (they are NOT bad scopes at all, as it turns out), and the turned-down bolt is already done. What would that cost you to purchase and have that 'gunsmithing work' done to YOUR rifle? (hint: I bet it is going to be a LOT more than $400).

    You MIGHT need to shim and barrel wrap the rifle, and work on the trigger, which are usually pretty easy do-it-yourself jobs. You would very likely need to do those to your rifle anyway.

    All you need do now is buy your super scope and mount. AGAIN, money you would need to put out in either case, and no different if you bought it for your old rifle or the clone.

    If you are hellbent on Bubbaing the rifle you already have, this won't mean anything to you, but you CAN NOT say it is going to cost you less to do it YOUR way.
    Perhaps like Ronbo6 suggested, perhaps you could sell the rifle for $200-$250 and use the funds to upgrade?

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