How do you tell if a rifle is unrearsenald?
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Thread: How do you tell if a rifle is unrearsenald?

  1. #1

    Default How do you tell if a rifle is unrearsenald?

    What all do you look for when you are trying to tell if a mosin has been rearsenald? I've looked online and I keep finding mixed info it seems.
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  2. #2
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    One good indicator is that the rear sight base isn't pinned. That and no import or refurb marks that I can see on the one in the photo

  3. #3
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    One of the most common marks is a circle with two crossed hammers. If you find that anywhere, it's definitely been worked on. However, given all the various circle marks on the gun, I'd say it's highly likely it's been rearsenaled. Someone more knowledgeable can tell you more. Note that they didn't always alter the guns during this time. If they passed inspection they simply stamped them and put them back into storage.

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  5. #4

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    It is non import marked, i think bubba got a hold of the stock.

  6. #5
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    Whether you consider a particular gun refurbished can be a pretty subjective thing. You have full factory mass teardown/scrub/polish/reblue/remanufacture refurbishment, "light" refurbishment (small stock repairs/refinish with metal left original matching), rifles with some parts replaced (with or without renumbering to match) etc., plus in a way, you could even call a complete mixmaster "refurbished" in a way, since some military establishment somewhere made a serviceable rifle out of a pile of mismatched parts.


    Quote Originally Posted by WardenWolf View Post
    One of the most common marks is a circle with two crossed hammers. If you find that anywhere, it's definitely been worked on. However, given all the various circle marks on the gun, I'd say it's highly likely it's been rearsenaled. Someone more knowledgeable can tell you more. Note that they didn't always alter the guns during this time. If they passed inspection they simply stamped them and put them back into storage.
    All the circled markings look to be original manufacturing proofs (point of aim proof, black powder proof, accuracy proof, acceptance mark, etc.).

    Quote Originally Posted by milsurpsupreme View Post
    It is non import marked, i think bubba got a hold of the stock.
    This rifle in a lot of ways has the look of a Spanish Civil war Mosin. The rifle serial and the mismatched buttplate serial are both in the thick of known 1936 SCW batches. The bolt, however, is from too late production to be SCW. Still possible that a previous US owner replaced the bolt, I suppose.







  7. #6

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    That's pretty cool i never thought it might possibly have been from the scw batch.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ol' Relic View Post
    Whether you consider a particular gun refurbished can be a pretty subjective thing. You have full factory mass teardown/scrub/polish/reblue/remanufacture refurbishment, "light" refurbishment (small stock repairs/refinish with metal left original matching), rifles with some parts replaced (with or without renumbering to match) etc., plus in a way, you could even call a complete mixmaster "refurbished" in a way, since some military establishment somewhere made a serviceable rifle out of a pile of mismatched parts.




    All the circled markings look to be original manufacturing proofs (point of aim proof, black powder proof, accuracy proof, acceptance mark, etc.).



    This rifle in a lot of ways has the look of a Spanish Civil war Mosin. The rifle serial and the mismatched buttplate serial are both in the thick of known 1936 SCW batches. The bolt, however, is from too late production to be SCW. Still possible that a previous US owner replaced the bolt, I suppose.

    While there very little evidence of a 1938 dated SCW I haven't rule out the possibility. There are recorded shipments past 1937 and I have seen one very good 1938 date 91-30 candidate. A bolt swap would seem a more likely if this rifle is indeed a SCW. See link for 1938 U decide SCW

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...ictures-inside

    milsurpsupreme....Nice rifle that's looks to have missed being refurbished. Nice find. Denny

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Denny View Post
    While there very little evidence of a 1938 dated SCW I haven't rule out the possibility. There are recorded shipments past 1937 and I have seen one very good 1938 date 91-30 candidate. A bolt swap would seem a more likely if this rifle is indeed a SCW. See link for 1938 U decide SCW

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...ictures-inside

    milsurpsupreme....Nice rifle that's looks to have missed being refurbished. Nice find. Denny
    Minor possibility the bolt could have been on a '38 that went to Spain, I suppose. Probably still more likely changed post-import if the gun is in fact an SCW, as mentioned. Stock really has the SCW look, IMO.







  10. #9

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    Is there certain markings to look for that would prove it to be a scw?

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by milsurpsupreme View Post
    Is there certain markings to look for that would prove it to be a scw?

    Lots of good info here.....

    http://scwmosin.weebly.com/index.html

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Denny View Post
    While there very little evidence of a 1938 dated SCW I haven't rule out the possibility. There are recorded shipments past 1937 and I have seen one very good 1938 date 91-30 candidate. A bolt swap would seem a more likely if this rifle is indeed a SCW. See link for 1938 U decide SCW

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...ictures-inside

    milsurpsupreme....Nice rifle that's looks to have missed being refurbished. Nice find. Denny
    Thank you, i am really digging the look of it.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Denny View Post
    Lots of good info here.....

    http://scwmosin.weebly.com/index.html
    Thanks for the link.

  14. #13
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    As a note, many SCW Mosins are import marked "Made in USSR."

    Two quick but not infallible clues to a non-refurb are an original, non-red-shellac stock and, of course, the lack of a refurb mark, usually the little box stamp with a slash across it. Look for mixed bolt parts on a nicely polished and renumbered bolt as well.

    Non-refurbs will also often have a rather distinctive wear pattern to the stamped date and cartouche, a slight loss of bluing around the stamps where the slightly raised metal around the stamping is very thin but the other bluing is good. This looks like a kind of glow or highlighting around the date and serial numbers.

    Other signs are correct number fonts on bolt and floorplate, full serial number with preface letters on bolt and floorplate and consistent wear on all parts. Consistent wear will immediately give away most fake snipers and similar alterations -all parts including mounts, base and scope should have consistent wear - new mount, for example, touching a worn receiver is obviously an add-on.

    Most Mosins that actually saw action have needed their floorplate replaced from firing while leaning on rough surfaces and almost all have bolt replacements, sometimes seen in non-refurbs as well as bolts were often swapped when the got questionable from rust even in the field.

  15. #14

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    Thanks for the info, it looks to me that this rifle has an equal wear pattern throughout the entire rifle.

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