This might come in handy for some of us...
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Thread: This might come in handy for some of us...

  1. #1
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    Default This might come in handy for some of us...

    Hate to post something on-topic but it's been on my mind so...

    http://www.businessinsider.com/nucle...shelter-2017-3

    FWIW, I know a guy who used to be a translator for the CIA and he was way into studying nuke bomb blast survival tricks (we used to have an airforce base here with a SAC deep underground bunker complex, so we would get lit up for sure).
    He said a trench with a car hood covered in about a foot of soil would keep you safe till the rads went down somewhat or enough to move around outside to get out of the area/be evacuated.
    He also used to collect car wheel weights and melt them down, pour it on the sidewalk to make sheets to line his trench..
    He also suggested for longer term to store potting soil and seeds in containers wrapped in the lead sheets..
    This was 30 years ago, he finally got sick of living here and moved to Brazil where he works as a translator.
    Last edited by chasdev; 04-15-2017 at 05:53 PM.

  2. #2
    Clyde's Avatar
    Clyde is online now Gold Bullet Member and Noted Curmudgeon
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    Well, depends. On just where the bomb went off, including altitude and all.

    Problem with iving after the prompt radiation went down (few days) would be cropping a contminated area. And of course breathing the contaminated air just after burst. Need some kind of heremetically sealed refuge with stored ir or VERY good filters. And of course water. And power....
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    I live in Nuke City, AKA Albuquerque, New Mexico. We have multiple targets in a relatively small area, both, military and civilian. Not to mention KUMSC, which has enough nukes to make New Mexico, if it were a nation, a the 3rd largest nuke "superpower" in the world. I don't worry about surviving a strike, I'd rather be vaporized in the instant sunshine, rather than living though it.

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  5. #4
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    There used to be an apartment complex across the highway from the air base and we used to call it the Ground Zero apartments...

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clyde View Post
    Well, depends. On just where the bomb went off, including altitude and all.

    Problem with iving after the prompt radiation went down (few days) would be cropping a contminated area. And of course breathing the contaminated air just after burst. Need some kind of heremetically sealed refuge with stored ir or VERY good filters. And of course water. And power....
    Not so much... depend on how many nukes over all somewhat... but the radiation type and half life is totally different between a reactor accident and a nuke war... Nevada has had 700 something nukes set off and you don't see a whole lot of off reservation nuke issues They were a Tourist Attraction .. Hiroshima and Nagasaki were never evacuated and casualties are pretty much confined to folks who were there when the bombs went off ... Fukushima is the equivalent of 6000-8000 bombs going off radiation wise in that spot in a very very short period ... Nuke weapons are going to be blast and heat and all the associated crap getting flung around thru the air and buildings falling down .

    A reactor you got 100 tons more or less of nuclear material to provide long half life stuff and a lot of medium half life stuff but very little super short half life stuff .. Nuke blast you got 50 pounds or so +/- long half life stuff and it is spread all over hellandgone by the blast and the mushroom cloud taking it up in the upper atmosphere and spreading on the high altitude winds and you have a lot of intense induced radiation in the metals/minerals in the soil at the blast site, fallout ( normally non radioactive stuff that gets vaporized and irradiated with very short half lives_ month 6 weeks and that is way way down) the contamination as we think of it from a reactor accident is just from the 50 pounds or so of active material in the weapon pit .. A reactor whole different thing .. it's been making daughters like your cesium and strontium for years it's a 100 TONS TONS not pounds, of active material that last for millennium at relatively high levels 1000's of years not 4-6 weeks .

    You really need to separate the two events in your head .. the threat is different, really really different what works for one will kill you with the other and vice versa.

    Nukes mostly kill from blast and heat you survive the blast and heat and you got a pretty fair chance of surviving and if you home is still standing, living in it sooner rather than later ( always a good idea to leave the area for a while few weeks) .. just like they do at Hiroshima and Nagasaki.. not much in a reactor accident to make prompt casualties .. but nobody is ever going home again and surviving to tell about it .. well almost nobody .. contamination patterns are fickle as hell the wind the rain the lack of wind rain Hot here not there here and there not there and here ..

    very very different you need a meter .. the more bombs the worse your chances the more melt downs the worse you chances ... that's about where the similarity ends

    just saying most the folks at Hiroshima and Nagasaki that ( in the general area , that saw the blast , well may not saw saw [ knew it happened when it happened] the blast , certainly not those at ground zero ) were there when the bomb went off, survived. yes as these things go Hiroshima and Nagasaki were small bombs and that matters ,,, I am talking more the general rule bombs are not nuke accidents and vice versa
    Last edited by AmmoSgt; 04-16-2017 at 08:18 AM.
    "It's frightening to think that you might not know something, but more frightening to think that, by and large, the world is run by people who have faith that they know exactly what's going on."
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  7. #6
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    did he die of lead posioning

  8. #7
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    Not as of yet, he's happy as a clam in a mudbank down in Brazil..of course he spent many years there before moving so he knows the lay of the land so to speak.

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