M28-57 - range report - first rounds
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Thread: M28-57 - range report - first rounds

  1. #1
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    Default M28-57 - range report - first rounds

    Hi

    some of you may have seen how nice is Finland with her nature, women and of course Rifles.

    i went this morning at range with a M28-57 to test it and try various ammo.

    i only shoot at 100m for the first rounds, next time i will shoot to 200m.

    the pics show you 155gr lapua scenar ( 5 rounds ), 185gr D47 lapua ( 5 rounds ) and 200gr D166 lapua ( 2 series - 4 and 3 rounds), all homemade with N140 and cci200.

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    if someone plays with one, what kind of ammo does he use ?

  2. #2
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    Rifle is designed for the military d166 load

  3. #3
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    Seems like healthy "JK/39 with diopter" accuracy to me. I would use D-166 and 2.80 or 2.85 grams of N140 for that one as the base rifle is m/39.

    How was this nuclear device shipped? Mine was all messed up after travelling 350 km or so. Fortunately it didn't end like North Korean missile test.


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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack57000 View Post
    Hi

    some of you may have seen how nice is Finland with her nature, women and of course Rifles.
    Thanks for posting! Real nice uncommon rifle!

    Finnish women???

    Pahtu.

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    2000km by airplane, 350km in my car, in a nice boxClick image for larger version. 

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    Wow, that's a double standard to say the least.

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    Wow that's a beautiful rifle with great accuracy! Thanks for sharing with us! Bill
    zeebill live from the hills of West Virginia!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CH View Post
    Wow, that's a double standard to say the least.
    That's because he is his best customer

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    Oh the Finnish mindset, what a great advantage for you folks...
    Last edited by CH; 04-17-2017 at 08:30 AM.

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    Who is the maker of the barrel by the way? I can see the caliber marking on the left side of the chamber but is it a CIP mark or part of the actual barrel markings?

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    i know what is a cip mark, but what kind of mark are on the barrel from the various manufacture ?

    i have a late 69 and 70 M39 with a no mark barrel excepted the date.

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    I'm afraid that's rather broad question to answer. Basically you can find all the possible m/39 or m/28-30 barrel marks there or if the gun has been assembled later by a gunsmith with aftermarket barrel he may have left his marks. Is this a four groove barrel or something else?

    This thread might help you out with the markings.

    http://forums.gunboards.com/showthre...arkings-thread

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    yes it looks being a 4 groove, i will check during the next cleaning with a vfg pellet.

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    Beautiful rifle, you must be proud to own that. Good shooting too! Thanks for showing us...

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    of course i'm happy to get a rare shooter like this one, and it's always fun to go at range with it.
    the funniest part is the visit of others shooters, and some coments like " it seems to be a mosin, but it's a strange one" when most of the shooters here have 91/30 and have never seen a Finnish one.

    Finland has still a lot of treasures, and you can always do a show at range with rifles from this country ...

    when you exhibit a saturday afternoon 3 winch95 russian in original condition, because Finland has tons of them, your table becomes very fast an attraction.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack57000 View Post
    Finland has still a lot of treasures, and you can always do a show at range with rifles from this country ...
    If this means Mosin-Nagants, I think over 90% of what we had has been shipped away. Don't know about you guys but the way I figure, if this keeps going and yet another uncommon rifle is pulled out of the country, it would be fair to have it replaced by another uncommon collectible, not money. That is to say, if you come here to get a civilian sales m/28-30 or m/39-43, please leave an m/27 RV or m/91 RV or something else we have no access anymore. The door should open the both ways in my opinion. Does that make any sense or am I just a hypocrite bastard here?

    I've had a Finnish scalper (not this seller) saying personally he couldn't care less if his actions do harm to local collectors. However, he doesn't seem to realize he's digging his own grave as well. The rifles are not coming back but go out of circulation for good and eventually he has nothing to sell. Fair trade, huh?

    I'm sorry, OT posts like this should probably be on Minefield or somewhere else.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CH View Post
    If this means Mosin-Nagants, I think over 90% of what we had has been shipped away. Don't know about you guys but the way I figure, if this keeps going and yet another uncommon rifle is pulled out of the country, it would be fair to have it replaced by another uncommon collectible, not money. That is to say, if you come here to get a civilian sales m/28-30 or m/39-43, please leave an m/27 RV or m/91 RV or something else we have no access anymore. The door should open the both ways in my opinion. Does that make any sense or am I just a hypocrite bastard here?

    I've had a Finnish scalper (not this seller) saying personally he couldn't care less if his actions do harm to local collectors. However, he doesn't seem to realize he's digging his own grave as well. The rifles are not coming back but go out of circulation for good and eventually he has nothing to sell. Fair trade, huh?

    I'm sorry, OT posts like this should probably be on Minefield or somewhere else.

    is there a lot of people in Finland collecting local rifles ? if someone like me, with 3 or 4 contacts can get this kind of rifles... why the local collectors missed it ?

    i've seen one on asetekno website, ok you may find it expensive regarding what you usually pay, he needs a bit of restoration but it s for sale for months, maybe years ... i've always seen it for sale. nobody looks interested ?

    it's a bit like the winch95, you have a lot of them, i get some in original condition, i get also one in hunting mode but original caliber and i've ordered woods in usa to restore it in original condition.
    one rifle in your country is less expensive than a part of the rifle on ebay or numrich...

    in France there is no russian winch95, and if you check for other win95 models, you can sometimes find some in specialized gunshop with a price going up to 4K€ ... so despite the high price of air shipping, fees ... it's always interesting to get rifles from you.

    unfortunately France has always mass produced the rifles, we don't have rare and prestigious guns like your, and they are expensive here because a lot of stupid governments have sold all of them everywhere in the world excepted here ...

    in example a MAS36, in original caliber/condition, is sold around 400€ in germany and 800 € in France, this rifle is all excepted rare as it was produced at around 2Millions units, so if you want one you import it from somewhere else.

    i don't know what kind of guns Finnish collectors are looking for, but they have some of the finest and nicest rifles of the world ...

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    sick

    CH, fear not, there are plenty of very good and very rare finnish Mosins left in Finland, at least around where I live and shoot.



    Mas 36 is like all other french designed weapons, it's . You can keep them !

    I fired all of the french designed weapons since 1893 except the 24/29, the 49/56 might be the only proper battle rifle produced by the french during the last 200 years.

    French designers tend to have the bad idea to look for stupidily complex solutions to fix simple problems.

    V
    Last edited by upnorth69; 04-18-2017 at 02:08 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorth69 View Post
    CH, fear not, there are plenty of very good and very rare finnish Mosins left in Finland, at least around where I live and shoot.



    Mas 36 is like all other french designed weapons, it's . You can keep them !

    I fired all of the french designed weapons since 1893 except the 24/29, the 49/56 might be the only proper battle rifle produced by the french during the last 200 years.

    French designers tend to have the bad idea to look for stupidily complex solutions to fix simple problems.

    V
    fortunately all the shooters are not as bigoted

    http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2...ked-greatness/


    anyway, it's not the subject here

    i tried a few rounds at 200m, at the closure of the range. result seems interesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack57000 View Post




    i tried a few rounds at 200m, at the closure of the range. result seems interesting.

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    With the ability to shoot like that, you sir, are always welcome in Montana!

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    Quote Originally Posted by CH View Post
    If this means Mosin-Nagants, I think over 90% of what we had has been shipped away. Don't know about you guys but the way I figure, if this keeps going and yet another uncommon rifle is pulled out of the country, it would be fair to have it replaced by another uncommon collectible, not money. That is to say, if you come here to get a civilian sales m/28-30 or m/39-43, please leave an m/27 RV or m/91 RV or something else we have no access anymore. The door should open the both ways in my opinion. Does that make any sense or am I just a hypocrite bastard here?

    I've had a Finnish scalper (not this seller) saying personally he couldn't care less if his actions do harm to local collectors. However, he doesn't seem to realize he's digging his own grave as well. The rifles are not coming back but go out of circulation for good and eventually he has nothing to sell. Fair trade, huh?

    I'm sorry, OT posts like this should probably be on Minefield or somewhere else.
    I understand your feelings on this. Yes, it should be easy to import whatever you want, Finn or otherwise. If it is legal, why is international purchase such a pain? We can not get back US 1911s, or other US pistols, given or provided for foreign aid from anyone. We can not get back the M1s and Carbines we provided to Korea. Silly laws with no logic or reason.

    That is good shooting and a fine rifle.

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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorth69 View Post
    CH, fear not, there are plenty of very good and very rare finnish Mosins left in Finland, at least around where I live and shoot.
    Plenty of rare rifles? Sounds like oxymoron to me.

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    Well, you get the idea.

    I must however say that interest here in finnish Mosins isn't maybe as high as it is in other countries and if you can make few hundred euros more by selling the same rifle outside Finland, why not ?

    At least the rifles will be preserved. At the end of the day, as long as one rifle of each variant remains in the country, where's the problem ?

    But hey, i'm a shooter, not a collector

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack57000 View Post
    fortunately all the shooters are not as bigoted
    Bigoted ?

    The best part of the MAS36 is the detachable bayonet spike, which is great to attach a white flag

    And just look at the TAR results in France with Mas36 rifles...

    Nuff said

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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorth69 View Post
    Well, you get the idea.

    I must however say that interest here in finnish Mosins isn't maybe as high as it is in other countries and if you can make few hundred euros more by selling the same rifle outside Finland, why not ?

    At least the rifles will be preserved. At the end of the day, as long as one rifle of each variant remains in the country, where's the problem ?
    Not really but what a heck.

    I doubt that lack of interest would be the main reason for limited demand, it's our gun laws. As we know, at the moment in Finland you can't buy a Mosin-Nagant just because it is nice to have or you might need one in the future. You have to have a proven history as a reservist shooter or you have to be a licensed collector. Hunters might get a license too but since, according to some, it's questionable if the rifle is well suitable for hunting one cannot necessarily count on that. If we exclude Finland, could you name a country that has as much or more interest in Finnish Mosin-Nagants per capita?

    One of each variant? Is there no problem as long as there's one in the War Museum? With some models like m/27 RVs that IS the case already. As to more common ones, yes, we are a small country and our market is limited. There's no way our market could have absorbed all the Mosin-Nagants that the Finnish Army has surplussed and it's good the excess was exported and is remaining where they are preserved. This has already happened and it's part of history now.

    However, the question of "abundance of Mosin-Nagants" still remaining Finland depends on whether we talk about the numbers in Finnish or worldwide scale. If we have over hundred rifles of some variant remaining in the country it means the gun is not very rare. It should be remembered though that quantity such as this is like a molecule in the ocean when it comes to global surplus market. What I'm saying here is that narrative like "Finland is full of treasures" to collectors around the world is somewhat the same as announcing "we have unlimited resources, you are welcome!" to the Third World people. Neither is sustainable.

    Yes, one or two not very rare rifles exported isn't the end of the world but at the end of the day this may become like the story of a fool man loading logs. After each log he said to his horse "If you can pull that, sure you can pull this too". This went on and on and when the load was ready the horse couldn't pull the logs. The man couldn't understand why.
    Last edited by CH; 04-23-2017 at 10:10 AM.

  27. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorth69 View Post
    CH, fear not, there are plenty of very good and very rare finnish Mosins left in Finland, at least around where I live and shoot.



    Mas 36 is like all other french designed weapons, it's . You can keep them !

    I fired all of the french designed weapons since 1893 except the 24/29, the 49/56 might be the only proper battle rifle produced by the french during the last 200 years.

    French designers tend to have the bad idea to look for stupidily complex solutions to fix simple problems.

    V
    What's so complex about French firearms? If anything they're wholly simplified.
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    Also, since you like Mosins so much, the Mosin bolt is nothing but a modified Lebel bolt.
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    I think one distinction needs to be made : the rifles that are in private hands in Finland can't really leave the country anymore because of the bureaucracy. On the other hand, there has been a small but steady influx of rifles entering shops because their previous owners died and the family does not care about this old junk. This is how i have gotten my mosins at bargain price and i suspect that another radioactive place is doing the same. On average i get offered one rifle to buy per 2 months from my channels, and since i passes on most they got to end up somewhere, France it seems

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    Quote Originally Posted by diss0lutus View Post
    What's so complex about French firearms? If anything they're wholly simplified.
    Attachment 2169978

    Also, since you like Mosins so much, the Mosin bolt is nothing but a modified Lebel bolt.
    and it happens to be the worst part of the design- mosin bolts aren't exactly fun to operate. Pb is that french designer always come with unconventional solutions that look good on paper but end up being a bitch in the field. Look at the famas, one kilogram on extra parts for a very average rifle.

    once you look at the m16 or the ak47 you understand what solid design is about !

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    there is not a lot of Finnish mosin in France, and most of them are in collector's hands, not shooters.
    even if this rifle is as accurate or maybe more accurate than a springfield 1903, all the best shooters are using 1903A3 and AR15 in competitions. all the A3 are stock bedding to get the best of them whereas it's useless with a m39

    now when you go to a challenge with a M39, a russian contract winchester 1895 or a M44, people are more interested by your guns and you can have nicer discussion than the best shooters with their a3.
    the mas in general falls in rare rifle because all the stock has been sold everywhere in the world excepted to french shooters, most of these rifles are reimported.

    you have 2 philosophy when you shoot , or you want a medal, or you want to keep alive interesting guns... up to each people to choose his mindset.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack57000 View Post
    there is not a lot of Finnish mosin in France, and most of them are in collector's hands, not shooters.
    even if this rifle is as accurate or maybe more accurate than a springfield 1903, all the best shooters are using 1903A3 and AR15 in competitions. all the A3 are stock bedding to get the best of them whereas it's useless with a m39

    now when you go to a challenge with a M39, a russian contract winchester 1895 or a M44, people are more interested by your guns and you can have nicer discussion than the best shooters with their a3.
    the mas in general falls in rare rifle because all the stock has been sold everywhere in the world excepted to french shooters, most of these rifles are reimported.

    you have 2 philosophy when you shoot , or you want a medal, or you want to keep alive interesting guns... up to each people to choose his mindset.

    In most (almost in all) MAS36 the POI changes a lot as the barrel gets warmer. It's a design flaw with the front wood furnitures. My grandfather was a regimental armorer from 1929 to 1949 in the french army and he always considered the MAS 36 to be a royal piece of shit, saying that it was designed at a time when there was plenty of good rifles to copy from and even being the last they could not get it right.

    He told for instance that it was not unusual for some Mas36 to be impossible to sight properly and these had to be put in storage or transferred to the Navy and Air force

    His personal opinion was that the Springfield was the best bolt action he worked on but considered the caliber to be too powerful for the job.

    So nothing really great about the 36

    The 49/56 has its flaws, for ex the french army ordered a batch of them in 7,62x51 but they never could get them to properly work (excessive wear) because of the bolt locking design

    Famas is very picky on the cases, ruptures with brass casing is not uncommon, to the point they had to armor the cheek rest !

    And so on

    These are examples of the french "design philosophy" where everything works but on the edge, without margin

    It is no secret why the french army took the HK416 - it is designed and made, at last, by the germans !

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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorth69 View Post
    In most (almost in all) MAS36 the POI changes a lot as the barrel gets warmer. It's a design flaw with the front wood furnitures. My grandfather was a regimental armorer from 1929 to 1949 in the french army and he always considered the MAS 36 to be a royal piece of shit, saying that it was designed at a time when there was plenty of good rifles to copy from and even being the last they could not get it right.

    He told for instance that it was not unusual for some Mas36 to be impossible to sight properly and these had to be put in storage or transferred to the Navy and Air force

    His personal opinion was that the Springfield was the best bolt action he worked on but considered the caliber to be too powerful for the job.

    So nothing really great about the 36

    The 49/56 has its flaws, for ex the french army ordered a batch of them in 7,62x51 but they never could get them to properly work (excessive wear) because of the bolt locking design

    Famas is very picky on the cases, ruptures with brass casing is not uncommon, to the point they had to armor the cheek rest !

    And so on

    These are examples of the french "design philosophy" where everything works but on the edge, without margin

    It is no secret why the french army took the HK416 - it is designed and made, at last, by the germans !
    All rifles have POI changes when the barrel heats up. I don't know what his rant about not being able to sight properly. The armorers had separate sight leafs to switch out to zero the rifle. It doesn't seem that hard to do.
    As for the 49/56, it's nothing different than any other tilting bolt design and they have replaceable locking surfaces. I've never heard anything bad about the 7.62NATO rifles. They were just test pieces.

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    Quote Originally Posted by upnorth69 View Post

    It is no secret why the french army took the HK416 - it is designed and made, at last, by the germans !
    or maybe because all these socialists and lefties politicians have closed all the small weapons manufactures here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jack57000 View Post
    or maybe because all these socialists and lefties politicians have closed all the small weapons manufactures here.
    Boy Jack, with an attitude like that, I think you'd do well in Montana. You could help counter balance the negative effect of the Californians that move here. Besides with the superb shooting you do with that M28-57, that's just what we need to reduce the surplus carnivores! Heck we even have towns with French names, like De Borgia, St. Ingnatius, come on over!

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