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Thread: firing pin depth

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Default firing pin depth

    hi folks,is there a proper depth or a way to measure same for a #4 bolt,there is a bit of room for error it seems-i presently have the rear just above flush with the cocking knob-thanks,scott

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Pennsyltucky USA
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    Default

    Firing pin protrusion is .040 to .050 and you also have bolt head timing to contend with or when the bolt head contacts the collar on the firing pin and starts pushing the cocking piece to the rear. The rear of the firing pin should be flush with the rear of the cocking piece.

    Read the Canadian No.4 Manuals below for more info.

    No.4 Enfield Maintenance Instructions dated June 28 1991
    http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/No4Mk1maint.pdf

    No.4 Enfield Operating Instructions dated July 15 1991
    http://home.comcast.net/~ehorton/No4Mk1oper.pdf


  3. #3
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    Dec 1969
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    Default

    great info there-thanks!

  4. #4
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    Dec 1969
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    Default

    is the small notch on the bolt tool for measuring depth per chance?????just noticed it

  5. #5
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    Default

    No the notch on the firing pin tool is NOT for firing pin protrusion unless you have a 155mm Howitzer (it far to long)

    Firing pin tool below, .040 on the left and .050 on the right

  6. #6
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    Dec 1969
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    Default

    thanks,any solid leads on affordable gauges?best iv'e seen is $30 plus shipping which may not be so bad i guess-scott

  7. #7
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    Default

    You can use a set of feeler gauges and eyeball it for much cheaper, using the gauge in the above posting if the firing pin is just over .040 and just under .50 you are using your eyeball also to guess where it is.

    You can also use the rear end of the vernier calipers and drill bits to measure protrusion.

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