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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Default Stock Bedding Release Agent - got any ?

    I am about to start my first bedding job (an M48 Yugo), and altho there is a hoard of stuff out there, kit form and otherwise, there is precious little of the release agent. Surely there is a cheap, readily available product that will act as a release agent for a bedding project? Maybe a spray can of ...... ? thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    136

    Default

    I bedded quite a few guns years ago, and had success using Kiwi paste type shoe polish. Make sure you get it in all the nooks and cranies.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    Default

    A good release agent is Johnson's Paste Wax, which you can buy in most hardware stores and even Walmart.

    It actually works better than some liquid agents and is easier to apply AND get off again.
    Apply it with soft toothbrush to all possible surfaces, DO NOT wipe off, leave the coating.

    Its also great for a protective coating on guns (wipe off this time) as the preferred protection for good leather holsters, and many other purposes.
    Last edited by dfariswheel; 02-11-2009 at 07:18 PM.

  4. #4
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    Feb 2008
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    Southeast Iowa
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    62

    Default paste wax?

    Thanks - but - won't the wax mix with the hardener and contaminate it? change the properties ?

  5. #5
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    Nov 2008
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    NW Arkansas. Close to the Okie line, so I can get across ahead of the tax man from Little Rock...
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    Default

    Nope. In the long ago I used to use it to cover bluing on my pretty guns. Then I gave up pretty guns....
    Pistol keeps me safe.
    Shotgun keeps me fed.
    Rifle keeps me free.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
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    Default

    PAM spray

    The stuff you use frying.

    Works great and is harmless.

  7. #7
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    Feb 2008
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    Default Paste wax versus PAM spray

    well, it's simple now. One gun each way. thanks, fellers

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    4,005

    Default

    I have done a Devcon epoxy bedding job on numerous rifles.
    Kiwi clear shoe polish is the agent of choice.
    Rub on a coat, let it dry, add one more.
    I have even used it wet.
    Bedding a Hakim (Instructions) - Gunboard's Forums
    As well as M44, M39, Winchester 338
    Devcon 10110 is some pretty tough stuff that adheres to just about anything.
    Kiwi worked just fine.
    Last edited by db2044; 02-11-2009 at 09:51 PM.

  9. #9
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    Dec 1969
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    Oldsmar, FL (Tampa Bay)
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    Default

    Regular release compound is available at most boat supply stores too, also in spray form last I looked. It goes on thicker than the wax and is easier to get the receiver out, but them the bedding isn't as tight, so its a trade-off.

    Whatever you do be sure to fill in any areas that are depressed and might lock in the receiver. Kids modeling clay is best - NOT Playdough. Not sure if this is a problem on the Yugo.

    A big rubber mallet comes in handy to remove the receiver/barrel before the bedding compound is completely set, while its still elastic. Read the directions carefully because if you let it sit too long it'll be a real bear to remove - like maybe requiring saws and chisels!
    I swear by Jupiter Optimus Maximus .... in the army of the consul Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus and for 10 miles around it I will not steal anything worth more than a sestertius in any one day.

  10. #10
    godsey5 Guest

    Default

    Kiwi neutral shoe polish works good. I like it better than the release agent that came with the brownells kits I've used. When I was reading up on bedding my 10/22 at rimfire central there were a some instances of having the actions locked in the stock using pam. I just bedded a swede action last week using the kiwi. Turned out really nice.

    Jim

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Silicon Valley
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    Default

    Liquid laundry detergent. It takes a while to dry but washes right off.
    You know all the words and you sing all the notes but you never quite learned the song.
    I can tell by the sadness in your eyes, that you never quite learned the song.

  12. #12
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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by bbbhunter View Post
    I am about to start my first bedding job (an M48 Yugo), and altho there is a hoard of stuff out there, kit form and otherwise, there is precious little of the release agent. Surely there is a cheap, readily available product that will act as a release agent for a bedding project? Maybe a spray can of ...... ? thanks
    BTW, I just noticed you are talking about an M48 Yugo here.

    I was wondering why you are bedding your M48?

    FWIW. I have had hundreds of Yugo M48s and variations. In all kinds of condition. Tested and for accuracy.

    The Yugo M48s have NEVER needed bedding with one exception.

    The only areas that cause problems are the recoil lug area and the resulting crack in the rear by the tang.

    This has occured in new unissued rifles after only a few hundred rounds. Specially the models with the "orange" colored wood.

    The barrel channels and receivers have never needed bedding on these rifles.

    The recoil lug area gets soft and is hammered loose by repeated shooting.

    There are several types of fixes we used depending on the severity.

    Sometimes a metal shim can be wedged in at the rear of the recoil lug and it takes care of the problem.

    Some needed to be bedded in that area with arcaglass.

    The POI will change drastically when the action gets movement from this type of problem. The accuracy also suffers dramatically.

    It got to be so common, that when after testing a unissued M48 for accuracy, it was SOP to bed the recoil lug area to prevent problems in the future. This was done only to the ones of exceptional accuracy and used for long range work.

    This was done to shooters only. Our shooters do not place "collector" value on the M48. The rifle will re sell for the same price if they are bedded in the recoil area or not from my experience. I have never had a problem of selling an exc. shooting accurized M48. They demand a premium in our neck of the woods and have people waiting in line for my collection of Yugos.



    Anyone that has a Yugo Mauser that does have play in the recoil area, will have to decide to fix it or have a wall hanger. Because they don't shoot well with movement in the receiver.

    The M48s are some of the most accurate milsurps out there and a good value for the money. Normally nothing needs to be done to them, they are accurate. Some need minor trigger tweeking, spare cocking pieces and triggers are common, for a lighter let off and that is about it. One of the few rifles that are available in unissued with new barrels.
    24/47s are also come with new barrels, some with M48 barrels newly installed.

    Arcaglass kits have plenty of release agent in the kit. Brownells has them as well as some gun shops.
    No need to get fancy. The kits are about $20 so why take a chance with other fixes?

    I use the release agent in the kit and for good measure spray the whole shee bang liberaly with PAM to make sure. PAM will spray right over the kits release agent and just give you the added edge.

    Also the Arcaglass kit is your absolute guarantee that the stuff you are using is strong enough to withstand years of pounding. The kit is relatively cheap and works.
    Last edited by RH7777; 02-12-2009 at 06:03 PM.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Southeast Iowa
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    62

    Default Good advice

    As for the 'why' - well, stock bedding is something I'd like to become proficient at and I have an extra Yugo to practice on. If I could wring a little extra accuracy out of it it might become my next deer rifle. Bedding the action can't hurt and the MOJO sights are fantastic - a lot less of the black fuzzball phenomena that I see in smaller apertures. I also plan to firelap the bore with grit-impregnated bullets. I'd like to see just how accurate this rifle can be, given every advantage.
    Interesting info about the stock problems. To an outsider they appear to be almost indestructible, to the eye and in the hand. How in the world did they lastthru two worl wars, or, is this just unique to the Yugo mause variation ?
    Keep in touch

  14. #14
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    Apr 2008
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    It is much more common on Yugo Mausers. Rarely on K98s or other Mauser variations.

    This is from our experience only. Many years of testing Mausers, countless rifles.

    Yugo Mausers are some one of the best Milsurp rifle buys out there IMO. They are rugged and very accurate in gen. when the barrel is in good shape.

    Wood selection may be a factor. The lighter (orange) woods seem to be softer and have more recoil lug problems. The older Walnut 24/47 stocks do not in gen. have this problem.

    Only a small percentage develope this problem.
    I emphasized it only in the context of rifles that are going to be shot a lot and accurized, and since you are going to bed the action anyway this is the area that needs attention.

    Bore lapping cost money. These rifles are pretty easy to find with new or like new bores.

    If the bore needs to be lapped, there is a good chance that the throat is not prestine, as well as the crown may need to be touched up. The throat erosion and crown are a big factor in accuracy. As well as good lands in the bore.

    Bedding a M48 will not make it more accurate. Unless you have something loose in the action. It is the same concept as scoping a rifle will not make it more accurate.

    If something is not right with the way the receiver sits in the wood initially, then bedding will affect accuracy.

    To get the optimum accuracy we start out with the best we can find. Like a near or new barreled Mauser.

    Many years ago I also played around with trying to accurize used rifles only with very moderate success.

    We have found it is more cost productive to start with an unissued Mauser since they are available and relatively cheap.

    Not all unissued rifles are of sniper quality. A lot countries tested their Military rifles right at the factory to see if they qualify for sniper rifles. Only a small percentage make the grade in accuracy. They are then modified with better triggers and other tricks to make them a new animal alltogether. Yugo rifles never had a "factory" sniper M48 with the exception of a few prototypes with PU scopes according to Branko Zastava plant historian.

    All Yugo scoped rifles are field expedient, converted by different factions in the old Yugoslavia. Or used by Forest service or hunters etc.

    Also for Yugo M48s the only ammo on the market that will give you the consistancy you want is M75 sniper ammo or Yugo seventies. Both are getting harder to find.

    All the other milsurp ammo is not consistant enough for paper target shooting at ranges of 100 yds. and over. There are batches of Yugo 50s ammo that are very accurate, but it is hard to get consistancy from case to case.

    Handloads can be on par with the Yugo M75 but not better from many years of trial and error in this area.

    Good luck with your project. Let us know how it turns out.

    Not all, but most new M48s are capable of shooting 1" groups at 100 yds. with Yugo seventies or M75 ammo. From bench rest.

    Our testing standards for scoping and sinking a lot of money into a Yugo Mauser are all touching 5 shot groups at 100 yds. using M75 ammo. Otherwise it is not going to shoot well at long range and it is not cheap to scope one of these. A light trigger is paramount in such a project.

    To minimize the human factor, we use bench rest and final tests are done by at least two of our more talented younger match shooter.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
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    BumbFK
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    1,721

    Default

    A few hours in the freezer will make them easier to get out if it's really tight/won't come out with a few taps of the rubber mallet.
    How many psi in a CUP?

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