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Thread: Smoothing Mauser Trigger

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,347

    Default Smoothing Mauser Trigger

    I finished scoping my Turk mauser, but the trigger isn't the best. Its kinda gummy during the first stage, then takes a bit of pressure to break.

    People I've talked to say "polish it", but I'm not sure where to start or how much material to remove.

    anybody have any tips or photos on where to polish? I have a dremel, do I use a grinding tool or just the polishing compound?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    St. Joseph, MO
    Posts
    125

    Default

    What I did on a Type 38 Arisaka (same exact design trigger/sear/striker) is start with fine valve lapping compound dabbed on the striker. Close the bolt and work the trigger just on the first stage. Squeeze & release over and over cleaning every once in a while and applying fresh compound. Do not let the striker fall as it will spatter lapping compound inside the reciever. Finished up with some superfine diamond compound I got at work from the die room. Polished the rest of the mating surfaces (trigger humps, bottom of sear) with 600 wet or dry paper.

    I think it would be nearly impossible to free hand grind with a Dremmel and keep the sear/striker surfaces in proper alignment.
    Delta co. 1st Bn 8th Inf. 1969.
    Plei Trap Valley Duck and Dodge Club.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,385

    Default

    The key to your Mauser let off and pull is in the cocking piece.

    Make sure your trigger humps and sear are perfectly clean and smooth and lubed. THat is all you need as far as the trigger parts are concerned.

    It is a good idea to have several cocking pieces to work with. If you change the cocking piece, you will immediatly notice a different let off, usually.

    Lay the pieces out in front of you and you will see where the sear makes contact with the front part of the cocking piecs. THAT IS the area on the cocking piece that needs to be altered. Careful not to remove too much near the end where the two pieces "break" off. Polishing the "top" of that are will smooth out the first stage pull.

    The front part of the cocking piece that the sear makes contact with can be polished a bit to change the whole feel.

    It takes a lot of practise to get it right.

    I have a bin full of cocking pieces, because each rifle is different and it takes trial and error.

    It is important to keep things as square as possible.

    I just use the rubberized abrasive wheels for Dremmel. THese wheels are very hard to find, but they polish the surface very fine. Wheels are grey or green in color and are a rubberized polishing tool for Dremmel.

    You can also use an Arkansa stone, just takes longer.

    If you go too far, on the polishing you will ruin the cocking piece. So be carefull.

    With this method I can give our shooters any let off desired. From only ounces to five lbs.

    All of our scoped very accurate Mausers have a 12 oz or less trigger let off. It is an absolute must to have a very light trigger let off for long range target shooting.

    Turks are capable of exc. accuracy at long range with the right ammo and trigger.

    You can get extra cocking pieces at the usual parts houses, if available.

    If you have trouble finding parts for you trigger I have a bin full. In the near future I am doing a parts bin clean out sale. Lots of Turk Mauser and other parts.

    You might luck out and get it right by using your cocking piece and a very fine abrasive. You can also try using very fine 800 grit wet and dry sandpaper or emery cloth.

    It is important to note that NO work other than cleaning and minor polishing is needed on the sear and trigger humps.

    IT IS the cocking piece that that will dictate the LET OFF pressure.

    If you need pictures and details. e mail me.


    BE AWARE

    Altering the trigger mechanism, ie. cocking piece is VERY dangerous. If not done right the rifle may fire with the slightest jolt when in battery.

    We only do this to rifles used by very experienced shooters that NEVER point the muzzle anywhere other than DOWN RANGE when the bolt is in.

    However, the let off can be adjusted to 1 or 2 lbs depending on how much material you remove from the front of the cocking piece contact area.

    That is the reason to have several cocking pieces to work with.
    Last edited by RH7777; 02-18-2009 at 03:38 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    2,347

    Default

    here is the picture I was kinda using to polish.

    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y88...-diagramII.jpg

    would this be correct on areas in which to polish?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    alvin texas
    Posts
    323

    Default

    when i use a military trigger i do a lot more to the trigger & sear than the cocking piece.
    if you have a good understanding of levers, fulcrums & general trigger function modifying mauser triggers is a lot easier. i would suggest buying clyde baker's book "modern gunsmithing" it has some very good information on triger design & modification if you haven't done any trigger work before.
    the very first thing i do is polish the area on the receiver that the trigger mates to.
    the reason the first stage is light & the second stage is heavy is because of the distances from the fulcrum. the farther the distance from the fulcrum the heavier the pull. on a two stage trigger i like to shorten the second stage by removing about .040" from the back of the second stage hump then restone the radius. i use that as a starting point then work forward untill i'm happy with the result. then i give it a good polish with several stones.
    after that i turn my attention to the sear & cocking piece.
    if you dont have access to a surface grinder you can use stones for this part.
    i grind the front of the cocking piece on exact 90° angle to the centerline of the cockingpiece to square everything up. if you have the right white wheels the finish should come out very fine & only require very light honing to remove any marks. very lightly break the edge on the face & the bottom of the cocking piece.
    then i assemble everything together & put a very light coat of prussian blue on the face of the cocking piece & close the bolt then remove the bolt to check how the sear & cocking piece fit together. the prussian blue will transfer to the sear showing how the meet up. the trigger work will have raised the back of the sear up slightly. i stone the sear untill it mates up exactly with the cocking piece. then i clean everything up & adjust the sear height to my taste. if the trigger pull is to long on the second stage stone the top of the sear & try again untill you get it the way you want.
    i personally think the second stage hump needs to be moved about .050 forward to be just right but before i would go through that much trouble i would replace it with an aftermarket trigger & be done with it.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    2,385

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bch7773 View Post
    here is the picture I was kinda using to polish.

    http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y88...-diagramII.jpg

    would this be correct on areas in which to polish?
    The pictures you show have absolutely nothing to do with trigger functiion.

    It is a fix for hard to cycle bolts.

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