Vintage pic thread #55 - Page 126
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Thread: Vintage pic thread #55

  1. #5626
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  2. #5627
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    What in the world is #5624?

  3. #5628
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    Quote Originally Posted by Highrider View Post
    What in the world is #5624?

    My guess is it is a made-up photo. poking fun at the tall 'pagoda masts' you would find on Japanese warships.

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    Correct, I though some would get a chuckle out of it. Some IJN battleships got a little out of hand due to the lack of a good radar system.

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    Looks like it took a nasty hit to the mid-section.

    Could this be photo shopped?

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  11. #5636
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    Messerschmitt Me 323 Gigant, a converted glider. There are two specific instances I know of where they were used for emergency" transport ops with tragic outcomes. The first was the North Africa run, I believe when the Yanks and Brits were closing in on Tunsia in the last act, but could have been earlier. It was a turkey shoot for North African-based US? Brit? Both? fighter jocks. I've always imagined that even with all the excitement a fighter pilot had to feel terrible putting one down. Simple murder.

    The other incident was during the final acts in the Baltic, I believe. Part of a larger human tragedy that included this from wiki:
    "
    MV Wilhelm Gustloff was a German armed military transport ship which was sunk on 30 January 1945 by Soviet submarine S-13 in the Baltic Sea while evacuating German civilian refugees from East Prussia, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland and Estonia and military personnel from Gotenhafen as the Red Army advanced."




    Quote Originally Posted by collectR View Post
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    Looks like it took a nasty hit to the mid-section.

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    People from time to time put up pictures of German helmets all stacked up. Here are US helmets stacked up a few days into the Iwo Jima campaign.

    Gut wrenching

  13. #5638
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tempest2 View Post
    Messerschmitt Me 323 Gigant, a converted glider. There are two specific instances I know of where they were used for emergency" transport ops with tragic outcomes. The first was the North Africa run, I believe when the Yanks and Brits were closing in on Tunsia in the last act, but could have been earlier. It was a turkey shoot for North African-based US? Brit? Both? fighter jocks. I've always imagined that even with all the excitement a fighter pilot had to feel terrible putting one down. Simple murder.

    The other incident was during the final acts in the Baltic, I believe. Part of a larger human tragedy that included this from wiki:
    "
    MV Wilhelm Gustloff was a German armed military transport ship which was sunk on 30 January 1945 by Soviet submarine S-13 in the Baltic Sea while evacuating German civilian refugees from East Prussia, Lithuania, Latvia, Poland and Estonia and military personnel from Gotenhafen as the Red Army advanced."




    Saw a 1/72 model of a Gigant at an IPMS show a few years ago. HUGE.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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    Driver of British desert army M3 General Grant variant tank peers out to inspect battle damage, Western Desert, June 1942.

    Laugh hard and often.

    Gary

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    The morning of September 26, 1944; the exhausted survivors of the Oosterbeek perimeter (Operation Market-Garden) look relieved having crossed the Lower Rhine to safety...

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    Description

    Archer 17-pdr self-propelled gun near Nutterden, 9 February 1945.(Germany,Nordrhein-Westfalen)

    You always hear about the vulnerability of open top SP guns, but they were always meant to be more mobile versions of AT weapons already in use, that is to say, to be driven to a static position then fired. Something strikingly different to the doctrine of an assault gun.
    source:ww2talk


    Recent comments

    • Evillittlekenny (Tue 12 Mar 2013 06:13:49 PM EDT)
      Thought so that there is something fishy in this. Thanks for clarification.



    • ThunderboltFan (Tue 12 Mar 2013 01:11:35 AM EDT)
      Not possible to fire Archer's weapon while retreating. Once parked, the driver had to get out of his seat very quickly because the gun recoiled into his normal position. If he was in his seat, the gun would crush him.



    • Evillittlekenny (Mon 11 Mar 2013 06:30:17 PM EDT)
      Nice site, thanks!






    • Evillittlekenny (Mon 11 Mar 2013 05:58:35 PM EDT)
      show summary Mobility was a key attribute, the Archer was also designed to fire backwards to be able to get quickly away from the scene after a well placed shot. I have also once read that during retreating shots could be fired, but I have no idea how effective (because of precision) this would be, or if it would be done at all.



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    Description

    British soldiers with captured German submarines of the newest kind. Northern Germany, April 1945.

    Recent comments




    • Lusitania (Wed 06 Mar 2013 05:26:43 AM EST)
      Type XXI U-boats.



    Laugh hard and often.

    Gary

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    Captain William Stanley Moss (1921-1965) and Major Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) in German uniforms. Crete, April 1944, the time of the kidnapping of Crete's German commander General Heinrich Kreipe.


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    • patrick.lorent (Mon 04 Mar 2013 01:27:13 PM EST)
      and with the famous Sykes dagger on their belt?



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    Tsar Nicholas II blessing his troops (1916)

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    Can anyone name this device?

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    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails B.jpg  


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    Polish cavalry were far from the out dated push-overs many think they were. There is little or no evidence that Polish cavalry ever did dash headlong into Nazi panzers to be slaughtered wholesale. The entire tale is one of the enduring myths of the Second World War.

    The truth is that when they were deployed in the first days of the German invasion, the Polish cavalry frequently prevailed in battle. In a series of encounters in the opening days of the war Polish riders managed to break up German infantry formations, liberate captured towns and overrun fortified positions.

    https://militaryhistorynow.com/2013/...ond-world-war/

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    A U.S. Army reconnaissance patrol in Italy in 1943.

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    Mounted SS on a patrol in Russia.

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    G Troop, 10th Cavalry Brigade, Fort Riley, KS, April 1942. Up to the early 1940s, the U.S. Army had active horse cavalry units, little changed since the Indian Wars of the 19th Century.

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    Cavalry charge on the steppes of Russia during WW II

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    Imperial Japanese Army Cavalry in China.

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    Sonderkommando Elbe" sends 180 German Bf-109s to attack Allied bombers with the intent of ramming into them, aiming for either the tail, engines or cockpit, bailing out either before or after collision. While only 15 Allied bombers are attacked in this manner, eight are successfully destroyed. Most of the German pilots died, without inflicting the harm to the relentless Allied bombing campaign that had been hoped

    Imagine what the tail gunner was thinking

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    Kalinin K-7

    For some reading on this huge bird: https://www.warhistoryonline.com/mil...o-the-air.html

  32. #5657
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    Quote Originally Posted by collectR View Post
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    Kalinin K-7

    For some reading on this huge bird: https://www.warhistoryonline.com/mil...o-the-air.html
    fantasy piece, for a game?

    simple image search


    https://www.rcuniverse.com/forum/rc-...ver-built.html
    what's so funny about peace love and understanding?

  33. #5658
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    Quote Originally Posted by collectR View Post
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    Sonderkommando Elbe" sends 180 German Bf-109s to attack Allied bombers with the intent of ramming into them, aiming for either the tail, engines or cockpit, bailing out either before or after collision. While only 15 Allied bombers are attacked in this manner, eight are successfully destroyed. Most of the German pilots died, without inflicting the harm to the relentless Allied bombing campaign that had been hoped

    Imagine what the tail gunner was thinking
    do you know who did the painting in the top?



    story of that plane

    https://www.warhistoryonline.com/art...val-story.html
    what's so funny about peace love and understanding?

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    That's great! Thanks!

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    Quote Originally Posted by collectR View Post
    Can anyone name this device?
    3,7-cm-MaschinenFlak M 14 (Maxim-Nordenfeldt QF 1-pounder) WW1
    Its a jungle out there (Randy Newman)

  36. #5661
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    HMS Kingston (F64) was a K-class destroyer of the Royal Navy laid down by J. Samuel White and Company at Cowes on the Isle of Wight on 6 October 1937, launched on 9 January 1939 and commissioned on 14 September 1939. Kingston was involved in the evacuation of Greece in April 1941, and attacked and sank the enemy German submarine U-35 in the North Sea on 29 November 1939 in company with the destroyers Kashmir and Icarus. HMS Kingston took part in the Second Battle of Sirte, in March, 1942 where she was hit by a 15" shell fired by the Italian battleship "Vittorio Veneto". Whist in dry dock at Malta repairing damage from this encounter, Kingston was attacked by German Junkers 88 aircraft while on 11 April 1942 and damaged beyond repair, The HMS Kingston was scuttled in the channel between St. Paul’s Islands and St. Paul’s Bay to block submarines from accessing the shore.

    Laugh hard and often.

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  37. #5662
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    Irish Royal Fusiliers plowing a field. The French farmer had his horse requisitioned by the army. So,in came the armored Bren Carrier to do the horses work.

    Time taken: march 27 ,1940

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  38. #5663
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    Sicily, Summer 1943: a British 4.5 inch Medium Field Gun rounding a difficult bend in the hills between Scilla and Palmi during the operations after the Allied landing in Sicily. Note in background the coast and the sea (British Admiralty Photograph BNA6754 via Australian War Memorial)

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  39. #5664
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    A Grumman TBF Avenger of the Fleet Air Arm, exact date and location unknown.

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  40. #5665
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    HMS Furious from the air, 1941. At this stage, "Furious" was a humble transport carrier, carrying replacement aircraft for front line carriers such as HMS Ark Royal, and for ground bases in the Med. Four Hurricanes can be seen on the deck, replacements, no doubt, for an unidentified destination.

    This humble function conceals the huge historical significance of this vessel. Laid down as a "Courageous Class" battle cruiser during WW1, "Furious" actually became the long-term test-bed for the new class of capital ship, the aircraft carrier. The original inspiration for this came from Royal Navy C-in-C Admiral "Jackie" Fisher, founder of the RN Fleet Air Arm, who perceived that an effective means of transporting air power over water - superior to the early seaplanes and flying boats - was needed to help deal with the WW1 U-boat menace to the UK. Building on experience from limited experience of trials launching single Sopwith Camel and Pup fighters off improvised flight ramps installed on cruisers and destroyers, "Furious" was modified in the course of construction to accommodate aircraft hangars and elevators, and the development of a flight deck through the removal of much of the ship's superstructure. By March, 1918, after much hair-raising trial and error, a reasonably effective procedure for launching Sopwith fighters off the flight deck had been devised.

    Experiments continued in the postwar period, involving, mainly, the extension of the flight deck through the removal of most of the original cruiser superstructure. In WW2, "Furious" served first as a transatlantic escort carrier, then in a combat role in the Norway campaign. It subsequently served as a transport carrier in the Med. and in British home waters. By this stage, it was certainly obsolete in relation to its "childeren", the more modern carriers. It was finally decommissioned in 1954.

    Far from its original intended purpose, HMS Furious ended up as the predecessor and ancestor of all subsequent British, American and (through industrial espionage) Japanese aircraft carriers; and her legacy continues in carrier technology down to the present day. Best regards, J

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  41. #5666
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    Quote Originally Posted by John A. Larsen View Post
    In the photo of the Finnish bicycle soldiers, SA-Kuva 166301, what is the rifle the first man has slung on his back, as the for end does not look like a Mosin Nagant? John
    It looks to me like a 91/24 or 91/28 Carcano. As most know, the Italians sold Finland 95,400 M38 short rifles in 7.35mm which don't match the configuration of the picture. However, in Arendell and Woodrum's book 'Italy's Battle Rifle' states "The earliest M38 short rifles had a long hand-guard , no front band and only one screw through the small nose-cap to hold the bayonet lug". The rifle in the picture also seems to have the tall front sight sometimes seen on the Finnish Carcanos. Perhaps it is one these early M38 short rifles. Best. Tom

  42. #5667
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    Quote Originally Posted by curly1 View Post
    Description

    Captain William Stanley Moss (1921-1965) and Major Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) in German uniforms. Crete, April 1944, the time of the kidnapping of Crete's German commander General Heinrich Kreipe.


    Recent comments

    • patrick.lorent (Mon 04 Mar 2013 01:27:13 PM EST)
      and with the famous Sykes dagger on their belt?



    Wouldn't want to have been caught dressed that way.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

  43. #5668
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    no army treated those who were caught in their uniforms very well.

  44. #5669
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    oldpaul, Thanks! John

  45. #5670
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    Quote Originally Posted by eastbank View Post
    no army treated those who were caught in their uniforms very well.
    Nope, and don't have to. Wearing the other side's uniform works a forfeiture of status as a lawful combatant. And the protections offered by the various conventions on treatment of POWs.
    Absent comrades (sound of breaking glass)

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