Two G41(M) rifles sold this weekend
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Thread: Two G41(M) rifles sold this weekend

  1. #1
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    Question Two G41(M) rifles sold this weekend

    Rock Island's long-delayed March Premier Auction finally took place this past Friday to Sunday. On Friday, a G41(M) went for $6900. Yesterday afternoon, another one went for $12,650. They both looked good. Both stocks had been sanded to some degree, though the waffenamts and serial number were still visible on the Sunday rifle. Both had a couple of replacement parts that, while original G41(M) parts, were not original to their current host weapon. Does anyone know of any rational explanation for the wild difference in hammer prices between these two guns?

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    Auctions are very hard to make sense of sometimes. All it takes is two people that "have to have it" and it can get wild.

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    As spoken above auction prices reflect dream or nightmare prices and often not reality values. Many times these days they show many people who have large bankrolls are not always smart in using that money. Many times these days they are thinking of these auction buys as ways to inflate the value of a rifle so they can quickly take advantage of this in a quick resale to people who saw the price the gun went at auction and try to use that as a gauges in what to pay for one. The second buyer is the one who gets hurt after he realizes there is no way other than maybe the passage of many years he will get his money out of the rifle. Many of these auction buyers have already got buyers for their high priced buys and take a quick $500 and are more than happy heading down the road with money in their pocket. Bill
    zeebill live from the hills of West Virginia!

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    All it takes are Two Scholars with deep pockets to get into a bidding war....

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    I understand everything you're all saying, and agree that it sometimes happens, but it happens more frequently with one-of-a-kind or truly outstanding examples of things. This RIA Premier Auction has been pending for more than three months and folks have certainly had whatever time was needed to do a little research, and other than the fact that you could see a few faint waffenamts on the stock of one but not on the other, the guns were pretty much in the same condition. As I said, there were two G41(M) rifles, one in Friday's session and one in Sunday's session, and Friday's went for only a bit more than half of Sunday's. If the Sunday buyer already had a resale buyer lined up and expected to make a quick $500 after paying $12,650 (plus sales tax and shipping), why would that same buyer have passed on the chance to make six thousand more in profit by buying and reselling the Friday gun? For this reason, I doubt that the "quick resale" answer is the correct explanation of this particular outcome. I guess what I am concluding is that no one knows any substantive reason why a nice though hardly unique or truly exceptional G41(M) should have sold for twelve and a half thousand dollars, which really seems excessively and unreasonably high to me.

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    Probably as simple as the first one "got away" and a couple of bidders decided they weren't going to repeat that mistake the second time around.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigwagon View Post
    Probably as simple as the first one "got away" and a couple of bidders decided they weren't going to repeat that mistake the second time around.
    If that's true, those were two really uninformed bidders, which is unusual at RIAC in my experience, particularly at the twice-a-year Premium Auctions. The G41(M) is scarce but not THAT rare. Who knows, maybe the barrel of the Sunday gun was filled with a rod of 24K gold, and only those who went to the Thursday preview session knew about it!

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    Auctions are odd.

    After WWII, Inglis produced 6 Lightweight Hi Powers. 2 went to Britain for testing and are in a museum there. 2 went to the US for testing and later ended up in the commercial market. 2 remained in Canada for testing & ended up in the commercial market.

    One of the 2 that were sent to the US one was on Gunbroker - & never sold. As I recall, it was relisted around 5 times. I had put a bid on it of $4,000 and it did not reach the reserve. 2 big dealers had also bid (a little bit less than my $4,000. I inquired of the seller (a gun shop who had it on consignment for the owner) as to what the reserve was. I was told that the reserve was $10,000 as the owner had purchased it for $9,500 from RIA a few years prior.

    I had bid on it because I had one of the two that stayed in Canada (Paid $900 for it at a Ohio Gun Collectors show) & thought it would be neat to have one from each country. $10k was too much for me as the resale market for such is not very great & my kids would end up taking a big loss. It finally went back to RIA and brought around $11k as I recall. There were at least 2 bidders in order for it to get that high. Some people have more money than I.

    So auctions produce odd results.
    Charlie
    II Thessalonians 3:10
    Romans 1:26-32
    I Corinthians 6:9

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    At the very least, I am very glad to know that no one who reads and posts on this forum thinks that a nice though hardly unique or truly exceptional G41(M) is worth twelve and a half thousand dollars, which price is just crazy talk IMHO.

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    I am going to agree with BigWagon, bidding on the Friday gun was lower likely because the bidders figured they would wait and bid on the Sunday gun. Problem Sunday is not a next one, so if you want it, better bid. As an owner of a totally matching un-sanded (owned close to 40 years) G41(M) I watch prices when I see them. The last 3 months aside, Nice Matching Rifles sell between $8 & $10K, obviously poorer quality lower. There were 2 at the old MAX show 4 or 5 years ago at "your kidding" prices, still there Sunday afternoon. I have seen one mismatched part, on an otherwise nice rifle, drop the value by 30% !! And, as said, a sellers dream is to get a couple bidders with deep pockets who "have to have it." The Deep Pockets for desirable (anything) will always be out there and drive up prices because the don't care. Once you get into rare air of potentially 5 figure or 6 figure guns, a whole different set of buyers way up on that marketing curve show up. Just my 2 cents.

  12. #11

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    or,,, as my father used to say, some people have more money than brains! I have seen the same thing happen with classic cars. some clown with money, decides to pick up a new hobby,, guns, cars, whatever. it happens more than you can imagine! there is no law stating that you have to be smart to have money!

    Tuck

  13. #12

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    both of those 41m rifles had some problems. one was mis-matched and sanded stock;;.. and the other had a bad duffel cut. they went for 6900 and 12,650 with the premium. then;;.. maybe add sales tax and shipping which socks it to ya' ......... and also;;.. the g41w which sold there is now listed on gunbroker ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, .

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