M28/30
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Thread: M28/30

  1. #1
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    Default M28/30

    I just acquired an m28/30 that has what appears to be the storage coating for the wood that the Soviets were so well known for. My first thought is that it was a Soviet captured weapon that was just put in with the other Mosins placed in storage. Additional thoughts? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    The Soviets captured not a lot of 28/30's so I doubt they coated your rifle. The Finns covered them for storage with a storage oil called Eyesis which tends to degrade into a sticky mess and is very hard to remove. I may have the spelling on that oil off so be aware of that. I think Mangrove mentions this oil in one of his posts so maybe he will chime in here and enlighten you further. I have found little that removes this oil that I am not afraid of using because of the possibility of destroying the original finish so I can not help you there. I thought for years this was the remnants of the Pomo Lacquer that the Finns used but was corrected with the updates from overseas in knowledge. It presents a very sticky and hard to handle feel to the rifle and almost prevents shooting it in comfort. I only found that leaving it in the hot sunlight and wiping it down with Balistoll multiple times would remove the sticky feeling and make it more fun to shoot. Some of the coating still remains in color on the stock but the sticky feelings are gone now. Have patience and maybe so one else has a better answer. Bill
    zeebill live from the hills of West Virginia!

  3. #3
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    Thanks for the informed reply.
    The disadvantage to my description is that I’m only looking at it in the pictures posted with the auction. Still awaiting delivery. But wanted to get a leg up on it. What do you suppose the armorers would use??? Thanks again

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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeebill View Post
    The Finns covered them for storage with a storage oil called Eyesis which tends to degrade into a sticky mess and is very hard to remove.
    Quote Originally Posted by sarco789 View Post
    What do you suppose the armorers would use??? Thanks again
    Finnish military districts and depots used Shell Ensis Oil 152 at least since the mid-1960s to preserve the rifles. Some also used "English cannon crease" (englantilainen tykkirasva) or Anti-Corrol. Some units immersed the whole rifle to the oil, some poured it down the barrel.
    Last edited by Mangrove; 06-19-2020 at 09:42 AM.

  6. #5
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    That is to say, what do you suppose the armorers would use if they wanted to remove it?

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarco789 View Post
    That is to say, what do you suppose the armorers would use if they wanted to remove it?
    Shell recommends wiping it down or using alkaline solution. There is no need to remove the oil from the inside of the rifle.

  8. #7
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    Thanks Mangrove and zeebill. That oughta be of help.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mangrove View Post
    Shell recommends wiping it down or using alkaline solution. There is no need to remove the oil from the inside of the rifle.
    Being I have no idea what alkaline solution you might mean care to elaborate? I have found little or nothing that takes it off other than the sun and wiping it with Balistoll and that method is time consuming. Thanks for the help in the spelling got close this time but still off. Funny thing about it we used this oil at Dupont when I worked there for long term storage of machinery. I used Mineral Spirits there to remove it but I don't like the thought of what it might do to original finish on the stocks. Sticky stuff for sure! Thanks Mangrove! Bill
    zeebill live from the hills of West Virginia!

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by zeebill View Post
    Being I have no idea what alkaline solution you might mean care to elaborate?
    It is not mentioned by Shell what alkali/basic they refer to. Sodium carbonate dissolved in water is an example of an alkaline solution.

  11. #10
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    Mineral spirits is pretty tame stuff and not sure how much damage it is going to have. Old fashioned Lacquer thinner was a different animal. Mineral spirits is really barely a solvent. Not sure if they have tamed it down since I worked in a paint shop dept in industry. The flash point is really low and I know from using it as a solvent it is pretty weak. You got to try to get it to burn and the fumes are almost nothing. Lacquer thinner is volatile and hard on the skin and probably bad for the lungs as well. If mineral spirits cut it I would of used it. If it is the stuff I found in a few barrels I found it in, mineral spirits didn't cut it hardly at all. The stuff I recall was resistant to almost every solvent I tried. Might not be the same stuff you all are talking about? Must be some good pictures for a change to tell what your looking at? Congrats on your 28/30.

    Again the bore preservative I found came off hard. Lots of bore cleaner like Butches and scrubbing with brass bore brush. I about flipped when I first saw it and it looked like a pitted bore and rust all the way down the tube. Give away rust comes out and this stuff didn't. And maybe it isn't the same stuff. I never found the right solvent to cut that bore preservative the Finns used. Not sure if I tried gasoline and that might of worked. I don't like using gas for anything than running my vehicles and tractors, but sometimes Gas is the right solvent. Once the fumes dissipate it is safer to use. If your stupid and careless nothing is safe. Regards, John.

  12. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarco789 View Post
    Thanks for the informed reply.
    The disadvantage to my description is that I’m only looking at it in the pictures posted with the auction. Still awaiting delivery. But wanted to get a leg up on it. What do you suppose the armorers would use??? Thanks again
    Can you post a link to the auction?

  13. #12
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    Good old Anti-Gorrol [sic] from SA Store. Got about 4L of Ensis Oil too. Yes, it starts to dry surprisingly fast on a hot sunny day.


  14. #13
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    never experienced it. but Looks like this is very interesting

  15. #14
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    Well the stuff came off with several rubbings of isopropyl. It acted a lot like The Soviets’ shellac or whatever, only it was a bit more tenacious. The interior does have a gunky film that fits everyone’s description of the preservative used by the Finns. Removing the varnish revealed a lot of wartime damage, along with a hairline crack right side upper wrist. I trust such things to a local master in woodworking. If he doesn’t completely stabilize it and even hide crack, I’ll be surprized. Anyone who wants a look at it before it was stripped can go to Gunbroker and enter the number 870045680. Another question: what is appropriate for finishing the wood? I would just use several coats “boiled” linseed oil, but if there is a more Finnish Civil Guard method.

  16. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by sarco789 View Post
    Another question: what is appropriate for finishing the wood? I would just use several coats “boiled” linseed oil, but if there is a more Finnish Civil Guard method.
    Four Hour Pomo-Lacquer

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