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    Default Overpressure - shared from Facebook

    Admin of course delete if this is not allowed but I thought this was worth sharing. Not my rifle or eye, just sharing.

    Obviously we donít know the history of the rifle, itís been sporterized, and who knows what other loads had been pushed through it before, but itís a good cautionary tale for going to max in the older actions.

    He listed it was a 140 SGK w/ 43 of IMR4350. The two books I have that list loads for the older actions stop below 38 (of course we know they are conservative and have lawyers to please). IMRís website list 45 as max (for modern action is implied).

    He did get brass in his eye but it sounds like the doctor got everything but one deep piece out. Another reminder to wear safety glasses especially when pushing the upper limits.

    He list the cases as Hornady. Iíve never been a fan of them at 6.5...they just always seem too delicate and maybe thatís really true.






    Last edited by Stewbaby; 06-20-2020 at 11:35 AM.

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    Holy cow!! Hope your eye is ok.

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    The Hornady 10th Ed manual shows 41.5 gr IMR 4305 as max load with a 140 gr bullet. The rifle listed is a "Mauser Model 1896."

    The "victim" stated he fired four rounds of another load before this one. We need to know what those loads were; they may have also been overcharged and contributed to a progressive failure scenario.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kddiep View Post
    Holy cow!! Hope your eye is ok.
    Not me, shared from Facebook as a learning point

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    Hoping for your soon recovery Stewbaby. Take care and use reduced loads next time. Looks like a civilian gun though?
    Arms are for hugging

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    Quote Originally Posted by arilar View Post
    Hoping for your soon recovery Stewbaby. Take care and use reduced loads next time. Looks like a civilian gun though?
    It's not "Stewbaby"; he is only reporting another incident.

    Close up photo shows the action is a Carl Gustaf. The receiver ring was drilled and tapped for a scope mount. I think this may be significant.
    I am not an expert by any means on gun smithing and D&T work. I do know that receivers are typically surface hardened. This makes drilling very difficult, so the gun smith has to anneal - soften - the surface area to get the drill bit to dig into the metal. It is possible that the annealing procedure weakened the receiver ring. Again, this is conjecture on my part; folks with actual experience need to join in here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by arilar View Post
    Hoping for your soon recovery Stewbaby. Take care and use reduced loads next time. Looks like a civilian gun though?
    Not mine, shared from Facebook. I donít Owen any sporterized rifles

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    Hodgdon Manual #26 says 45.0 gr. is max. for IMR4350.
    Hard to tell what happened without having the rifle and ammo in your hands to analyze it, but I suspect a reloading mistake.
    Can't say for sure if the rifle was weakened by being sporterized, but that may have contributed to it as well.

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    Leon, NWSwede,

    I think you guys are spot on. If you look closely at one of the receiver pics from the right side, you can see the crack emanates from one of the drill holes..

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leon View Post

    Close up photo shows the action is a Carl Gustaf. The receiver ring was drilled and tapped for a scope mount. I think this may be significant.
    I am not an expert by any means on gun smithing and D&T work. I do know that receivers are typically surface hardened. This makes drilling very difficult, so the gun smith has to anneal - soften - the surface area to get the drill bit to dig into the metal. It is possible that the annealing procedure weakened the receiver ring. Again, this is conjecture on my part; folks with actual experience need to join in here.
    Leon : Carl Gustaf , Norma and civilian gunsmiths drilled & tapped all the snipers , CG63 , CG80 & etc. target rifles without any problem . A carbide center drill will drill through the hard surface without any problem , so no need to heat the metal to soften it . Of course , who knows what was done to this receiver ????????

    Swedish Contract P51d Mustang

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    Quote Originally Posted by swede View Post
    ... Of course , who knows what was done to this receiver ????????
    That is exactly my point. Without the exact information on some critical factors like the loads used before the one that went KABOOM and how the receiver was D&T'd, we cannot come to any objective conclusions.

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    Default Overpressure - shared from Facebook

    He finally reported the previous loads:

    ďThe previous 4 rounds shot were 140 Sierra GK, 44gr of H4831SC, CCI 200, factory OAL.Ē

    Thatís not really hot rodded but there again no telling what he shot days, weeks or years before. Just a cautionary tale on going outside the norm especially when the receiver has been messed with.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stewbaby View Post
    He finally reported the previous loads:

    “The previous 4 rounds shot were 140 Sierra GK, 44gr of H4831SC, CCI 200, factory OAL.”

    That’s not really hot rodded but there again no telling what he shot days, weeks or years before. Just a cautionary tale on going outside the norm especially when the receiver has been messed with.
    My Hornady manual shows 44.1 gr IMR 4831 as a max load. Note that is straight IMR 4831, not the "SC" version.

    ADDED: it took me a while to recognize that the reported powder in the initial lot was "H4831" and not IMR 4831. This raises another issue: when you have different powders with names that are similar, e.g. the aforesaid IMR 4831 and H4831, there is a possibility of confusing load data for one powder for the other, or thinking that they are "close enough" to use the same data as the other.

    Again, not knowing the history of the rifle, i.e what and how many high pressure loads the rifle has endured, my suspicion leans towards some weakening of the receiver ring due to an improperly done D&T.
    Last edited by Leon; 06-20-2020 at 06:15 PM.

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    Between variables of inadvertent powder load and all the possible factors in the history of century old rifles... A lot of 'room' for failures. If a handload can't be definitively identified, really too many variable to speculate absent some clear forensic indication to be found in the gun 'remnant' itself.
    A lot "marks of Bubba" we can identify as 'plain & clear'. A whole bunch more things possible, such never to be reasonably noted until 'kaboom' of strategic failure. One of the niceties of 'apparent' factory originality of sporting & military rifles as they come to us, is in "minimizing the possibility" of dangerous alterations. Particularly in milsurp sporters, many of us lucky that nothing bad occurring. Much of that 'luck' though, also attributable to great rifles; materials/designs/workmanship such as the Swedes, the quality-venue mausers, Springfields, Enfields, etc. The 'grenade effect' as seen here, a vivid reminder that nothing is infallible!

    Whomever shooter... Hope that eye ends up OK. Far more important it's "return to service" than that sad DOA remnant!
    "Take care"... Literally!
    Best!
    John
    Last edited by iskra; 06-21-2020 at 01:34 AM. Reason: Victim ID Correction

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    Quote Originally Posted by iskra View Post

    Stu, hope that eye of yours is OK. Far more important it's "return to service" than your sad DOA remnant!
    "Take care"... Literally!
    Best!
    John
    Thanks. I was just passing on from a Facebook post though. Not my eye or rifle, so Iím good. I donít even own a Bubba (though one for hunting is probably needed).

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    In my experiences of doing this on purpose _ http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...low-up-project _ one only sees brass turn to 'paint' at EXTREME pressure. IIRC, brass does that at around 80,000 psi. The scope holes had nothing to do with the failure but the extractor blowing through the sidewall of the receiver; hello Mr. Hatcher.... Swedish mausers are rather splintery when they go. I'd like to see the cartridge. Under the 'scope one can see little balls of brass that reformed after melting.

    Glad the fellow is ok, could have been much worse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    In my experiences of doing this on purpose _ http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...low-up-project _ one only sees brass turn to 'paint' at EXTREME pressure. IIRC, brass does that at around 80,000 psi. The scope holes had nothing to do with the failure but the extractor blowing through the sidewall of the receiver; hello Mr. Hatcher.... Swedish mausers are rather splintery when they go. I'd like to see the cartridge. Under the 'scope one can see little balls of brass that reformed after melting.

    Glad the fellow is ok, could have been much worse.
    I can see the case of the head and it appears to be intact. A "Hatcher Hole" is not relevant to a Mauser. The Springfield 03 and 03-A3 needed it because the breech face of the barrel does not enclose the case head, so when a case head separation occurred there was some place for the gasses to vent.

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    Leon, pardon me but the breech face of a '96 does not enclose the case head. And why does a '16 Spanish have one (hole to left with hole in bolt)? Also, seeing the case is meaningless at this point. In the post I added, one can see numerous case head failures without the 'paint'.

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    Look at the breech face of the barrel in an M96 and then look at the breech face in a Springfield 03. The M96 Mauser breech face is flat and perpendicular to the chamber opening, while the Springfield's is angled, like a cone. There is a considerable length of the 30-06's case rear hanging in open space when the cartridge is locked into the breech. Only the case's extraction groove is exposed in the Mauser breech, and only in the extractor notch. (Hatcher's book describes this in detail.)

    This also explains why the subject rifle blew out the extractor, since that is the only open channel directly adjacent to the case head. So if the receiver ring failed and the case ruptured, the Mauser's extractor notch is the only other path open to the released gas pressure. In the case of the 03, there is an open area surrounding the case head. The original 03 had a small vent hole on the right side of the receiver ring, while the later Remington and Smith Corona 03-A3 had the larger Hatcher hole on the right side of the receiver for more effective venting.

    Edit: re had the larger Hatcher hole on the right side of the receiver for more effective venting.
    The Hatcher hole is on the left side of the receiver ring. (It was too late at night when I first wrote this.)
    Last edited by Leon; 06-21-2020 at 10:26 AM.

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    You really didn't answer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    In my experiences of doing this on purpose _ http://castboolits.gunloads.com/show...low-up-project _ one only sees brass turn to 'paint' at EXTREME pressure. IIRC, brass does that at around 80,000 psi. The scope holes had nothing to do with the failure but the extractor blowing through the sidewall of the receiver; hello Mr. Hatcher.... Swedish mausers are rather splintery when they go. I'd like to see the cartridge. Under the 'scope one can see little balls of brass that reformed after melting.

    Glad the fellow is ok, could have been much worse.
    "...little balls of brass"; not to ignore collateral... GREAT BALLS OF FIRE!

    "Materials Destruction Testing", "MDT"; the nice, orderly, "intended" variety! Methodology offering positive scientific yields integrally achieving shortcutted-results. Particularly as teamed with such as high speed filmography, "computer modeling" integrated with 'material spec' constants; 'pesky variables-minimized'. Much info as deformation/yield strengths; engineered structures stress lines/fault areas emerging. Toward predictable "yield predictions and patterns..."
    Great "empirical tool; such as consequence parameters clearly anticipated, planned, controlled and results within "variables-predicted" destruction parameters"...
    Intended! Plus the fun of "KaBoom!" Minus the "Oh S...", "Oops Factors"!
    Best!
    John

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    this is an eye opening thread. thanks for posting. a really good example for all of us handloaders to take notice. i had a sportered M1896 many years ago; don't have one now. if you give this situation much thought, it's not all that wise to use 100 year old metal and design for modern day shooting. we can only guess at the cause and effect process involved, but i think there was probably an error in the loading process. looking at the state of the firearm, it sounds like the shooter came out VERY fortunate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty View Post
    ...if you give this situation much thought, it's not all that wise to use 100 year old metal and design for modern day shooting. we can only guess at the cause and effect process involved, but i think there was probably an error in the loading process. looking at the state of the firearm, it sounds like the shooter came out VERY fortunate.
    I am shooting a 101 year-old M96 with a scope. I of course did not D&T it. There is an excellent NDT scope mount for the M96 and M38 made by BadAce of Canada.

    There is no doubt that the subject rifle had an overpressure event. The initial proof testing and safety margins built into the rifle by design usually allow for the occasional excursion from normal pressure, but it is a different matter when these high pressure events are repeated. Also, as I pointed out, drilling and tapping the receiver ring may have induced stresses in the ring metal if not done correctly.

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    hi, Leon. your comments are all very valid and true. i'll just add another. many handloaders like to pooh-pooh the loading data that the manufacturers provide, and then list hot loads that they shoot in their rifles. doesn't seem very smart to me! when i was shooting a lot more, many years ago, i was shooting several pieces in cal. 7x57. after a few years, i found that Alliant Re19 gave good accuracy in that caliber, and also that a caseful of powder was the right amount. then i realized the best characteristic of that load was that it would probably be impossible to make an over pressure load with that powder in the 7x57 case.

    i try to always visually check the powder charged cases b4 i seat the bullets, to be sure they look right with the powder amount inside. there are ways and methods of handloading that will give an extra measure of safety to us. the main problem seems to be that a lot of handloaders think the most fun is to push the envelope and try for the highest velocity. one of the best things about getting old and arthritic is that our shoulder tells us to make milder loads, not hotter ones.

    i will readily admit that 40 years ago i used to push the envelope. i was lucky and didn't have a drastic experience such as what is displayed in the OP. i did get a facefull of hot gas about ten years ago, from a faulty, un-noticed case. no harmful results occurred; just more reasons to do this hobby in as safe a manner as possible. happy father's day, and Grandfathers day to all. be safe when handloading, and also healthwise. cheers.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty View Post
    ... many years ago, i was shooting several pieces in cal. 7x57. after a few years, i found that Alliant Re19 gave good accuracy in that caliber, and also that a caseful of powder was the right amount. then i realized the best characteristic of that load was that it would probably be impossible to make an over pressure load with that powder in the 7x57 case...

    This brings up a core issue of 6.5x55 reloads for the Swedish Mauser: charge density.

    A slow powder like Rel 22 or Vihta Vuori N165 lets you come close to filling the case. This is very important. We have had previous discussions on this forum about SEE - secondary explosion effect - and what can happen when you go below the minimum charge listed in a reliable reloading manual. By the same token, going above the maximum listed load is asking for trouble.

    I have a CZ550 in 6.5x55. This is the modern take of the Mauser 98 and also has the third safety bolt lug as well as the thicker receiver ring. There is separate load data for this and other later 6.5x55 rifles. Inattention to this difference is asking for trouble.

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    ^yeap

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    Just my 1.5 cents as that is all it is worth but there is something fishy in the state of Denmark here. The blowouts both occur in the area of the drilling and tapping. It is really hard to over do dupont 4350. You gotta wanna over pressure that powder. And last, you should not be messing with max charges in a 100 year old rifle. It will never get figured out but it is something that can happen at any time I guess. About a year a go I saw a guy blow out a brand new Browning BLR with brand new Hornady ammunition. Hornady never questioned the blow up and replaced the rifle from Browning.
    Plato:
    ďStrange times are these in which we live when old and young are taught falsehoods in school. And the person that dares to tell the truth is called at once a lunatic and foolĒ

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    Quote Originally Posted by gjnolte View Post
    Leon, NWSwede,

    I think you guys are spot on. If you look closely at one of the receiver pics from the right side, you can see the crack emanates from one of the drill holes..

    Yeah makes me wonder if whoever D&T'd that rifle either got that into the chamber or so close that it became an obvious weak point. Guess it is just another point in the column for not sporterizing military rifles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CopperniX View Post
    Yeah makes me wonder if whoever D&T'd that rifle either got that into the chamber or so close that it became an obvious weak point. Guess it is just another point in the column for not sporterizing military rifles.
    I might add that the CZ550 I mentioned earlier has beveled mount points milled into the receiver, so instead of drilling holes, they added metal. It's a bit of a nuisance having to get proprietary scope rings, but the reward is confidence that the pressure area around the receiver ring has not been compromised in any way.Click image for larger version. 

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    First pic is my M96 with the BadAce NDT scope mount. Scond pic is my CZ550. I intend to shoot 6.5x55 long after I can no longer get old eyes to focus on the iron sights.

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    Quote Originally Posted by iskra View Post
    "...little balls of brass"; not to ignore collateral... GREAT BALLS OF FIRE!

    "Materials Destruction Testing", "MDT"; the nice, orderly, "intended" variety! Methodology offering positive scientific yields integrally achieving shortcutted-results. Particularly as teamed with such as high speed filmography, "computer modeling" integrated with 'material spec' constants; 'pesky variables-minimized'. Much info as deformation/yield strengths; engineered structures stress lines/fault areas emerging. Toward predictable "yield predictions and patterns..."
    Great "empirical tool; such as consequence parameters clearly anticipated, planned, controlled and results within "variables-predicted" destruction parameters"...
    Intended! Plus the fun of "KaBoom!" Minus the "Oh S...", "Oops Factors"!
    Best!
    John
    I haven't a friggin' clue what the hell you are talking about.....

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    I haven't a friggin' clue what the hell you are talking about.....
    Perhaps principle exemplary in illustrative aspect.

    "Road Runner", streaking through open gate across barbed wire enclosed field. Standing some meters away at opposite gate, smiling. "Wile E. Coyote", giving chase. Halting at enclosure, noting sign. "Danger Anti Personnel Device Test Field." Conjuring R.R. passing undeterred; undaunted! W.E. sets off field-ward! Methodology in his risk approach! Gingerly testing each step, fingers in ears! The inevitable "Kaboom!" "Destructive testing" complete! Proving AP worth! W.E., earning "Test Successful Certificate of Appreciation" Duly recognized... Posthumously. Pleased AP maker avoiding expensive "non-destructive testing.
    Postscript. R.R. sells recently acquired AP firm stocks at "Banko" profit, retires to Rivera!
    And a warm... "Beep Beep" to you too!
    Best!
    John
    Last edited by iskra; 06-22-2020 at 12:46 AM. Reason: Banko! :)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frosty View Post
    . many handloaders like to pooh-pooh the loading data that the manufacturers provide, and then list hot loads that they shoot in their rifles. doesn't seem very smart to me!
    Yep, I was looking for a good load for 8x57 using a 198 grain bullet and somebody suggested their favorite load. I compared his load against what my manuals said and found his load was 2 grains over the max load. I pointed this out and the response was "I've been using this load for X number of year with no problem". Suffice it to say I did not go with his "data".

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    Quote Originally Posted by intruder196 View Post
    Yep, I was looking for a good load for 8x57 using a 198 grain bullet and somebody suggested their favorite load. I compared his load against what my manuals said and found his load was 2 grains over the max load. I pointed this out and the response was "I've been using this load for X number of year with no problem". Suffice it to say I did not go with his "data".
    A large ring Mauser is pretty robust, but when subjected to prolonged over pressure, your "extended warranty" is cancelled.

    The "I've been using this load for X number of year with no problem" is just another way of saying "nothing bad has happened...yet."

    What these people obviously don't get is that, although a rifle is proof tested to an extreme over pressure, that happens only once or twice in its life. It is expected to be used with ammo that is in spec. I got into it one day at my club range with another of these "I've been using this load for X number of year with no problem" reloaders. I tried to explain to him with this analogy. you hit a bar of steel with a 5# hammer and nothing happens. But you keep hitting it with that hammer for some prolonged period, and eventually the steel bar cracks. It is metal fatigue.

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    that's a really good example to describe. the problem for many shooters is their ignorance about how bad things can get if the destructive process begins. what is pictured in the OP is an uncommon occurrence that doesn't get seen much. an old, longtime shooter like myself find it difficult to believe; but seeing is believing. and seeing it now again, makes me think about this MORE, in the future.

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    Going off on a bit of a tangent, but still somewhat relevant: I noticed in the OP's pics how the floor plate was blown out and the surrounding stock wood splintered. This reminds me of an event a range club buddy had.

    He shoots various milsurps and practices a lot with milsurp ammo. He also typically takes 1st place in our club's monthly vintage rifle competition.
    The subject rifle was a Finn M39. He was shooting some Serbian M30 surplus ammo. This ammo is similar to commercial Prvi Partizan 7.62x54R 182 gr FMJBT. The M30 is similar, except it has a corrosive Berdan primer, and this is the biggie, there is a sealant around the bullet in the case neck.

    He was shooting some of this M30 when one round blew out its base. Now the Mosin Nagant action is very strong; my friend was not injured in any way, and, surprisingly, the M39 was also intact. The case blow out also blew the magazine floor plate open, and this is the funny part. The striker recocked. The blow back gasses entered the bolt head and reset the firing pin back far enough for the cocking piece's lug to catch on the sear.

    He got the case out; the base was blown out, and the bullet was still in the case neck. It had not moved at all.

    I and another club member that also reloads got some of the rounds from the box. I had a devil of a time pulling the bullets; the other guy could not get the bullet loose with his inertial puller. I managed to break the sealant by seating it in a bit and twisting out the bullet. That sealant apparently was the culprit; it held the bullet so tightly that was almost welded (or probably more accurately, brazed) into the case neck.

    This must have been a wonky lot of the Serb M30. I have shot lots of it, and so has my range buddy without any issue. It is excellent, accurate ammo. But like all mass-produced ammo, a production flaw can sneak into the flock. This is where the inherent strength and safety built into a good rifle saves your bacon.

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    that's interesting to read about. thinking on the description and the fact that the bullet was still in the case neck, it's hard to believe that the rifle was not damaged, badly. the floor plate must have opened very quickly in the process, giving the gas a large exit opening that was fortunately, in a direction away from the shooter. and thinking about this more, the process of the gas escaping had to be fast enuff so that the amount of gas pressure created was much less than usual. if the pressure had risen to the normal amount created, the rifle would have sustained major damage, and perhaps the shooter, also.

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    I too was amazed that the rifle did not blow up, i.e. have its barrel breech and receiver ring fracture like the one in the OP's pictures.

    The Mosin Nagant, despite its apparent clunkiness, is well designed from the safety perspective.

    First of all, it shoots a rimmed cartridge. That is a big safety factor. Second, the MN bolt head fully encloses the case's base and rim. There is a cut out in the bolt head's face for the ejector. That slot also serves as a gas vent, directing blow back upwards and at about 45 degrees to the rear, or above the shooter's head.

    The separate bolt head also lets blow back gas vent through the gap between it, the bolt body itself, and the bolt body connector. This is probably how the blow back gasses were directed into the magazine with sufficient efficiency to contain the gas inside the magazine and not get outside of it where it could splinter the stock wood surrounding the magazine.

    Another significant factor was that there was solidified "sludge" inside the case. This shows that the powder did not completely ignite. If you have ever had a "squib" where the primer fires but does not ignite the primer, the unburned powder is scorched and fused into a solid blob. But typically a "squib" will drive the bullet out of the case neck and jam it into the throat. So I suspect in my friend's situation he had a "squib" plus partial charge ignition.

    The reason the powder did not completely burn is likely because the bullet did not move and the initial burning generated so much pressure that it fused some of the unburnt powder before it could ignite.

  39. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Mississippi
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    Well we covered a lot of good points above but I donít think we touched on what the shooter thinks he actually did wrong now. His latest post is below:


  40. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
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    Manitoba,Canada
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    says he's been loading for 50 years, so he's probably in his 70's, like me. so i totally understand the mistake; brain farts getting more common at this age.

  41. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Dogpatch, NC
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    This is a cautionary tale, and something to take away a safety measure. I use several Vihta Vuori powders and the labels look the same unless you get up real close to read the powder type, which is in small print. In comparison, the labels on the IMR containers scream at you. I think Alliant's Reloder bottles are also well labeled.

    Anyhow, when I open a new bottle of Vihta Vuori, I write - in big letters - the caliber for which the powder is intended on the cap with a Sharpie. (I also write the date the bottle was first opened too.)

    Storing powders with such radically different burn rates in the same place, in close proximity, strikes me as a bad idea. I have my powder stored by burn rate and intended caliber, e.g. VV N165 and Rel 22 on the same shelf, VV N150 and Rel 17 on another, etc.

  42. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Monterey, CA
    Posts
    224

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    I've started loading with the wrong powder before but caught it after a dozen rounds or so. It always amazes me when I make a mistake like that as I'm very careful. But all it takes is a brief lapse and off you go.

  43. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
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    Last weekend my brother showed me a new ,once fired case with a blackened crack from primer pocket to rim edge ,and a sooted base......Put that in a 96 Mauser with the crack under the extractor cutout.....and its too late for NDT....HDT (highly destructive testing!)

  44. #43
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    Dogpatch, NC
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    First pic shows some case splits in Swiss GP11 brass. Nothing bad happened, other than a rather dirty chamber.

    Second pic is a 7.62x51 case with an Israeli head stamp. It is not clear if this was made in Israel or foreign-produced. I was shooting my M1A. There was a cloud of smoke, and the bottom of the magazine blew out. That was all that happened. All I did was strip the bolt to clean the firing pin and its channel of powder residue.

    Both case failures occurred with completely chambered rounds and locked bolts. Most military rifles are built to handle this sort of ammunition failure without any danger, provided the ammo is in spec and the bolt is closed and locked. However, a case failure, particularly at the head, when the cartridge is not fully chambered and locked in, is going to damage or destroy the rifle, and possibly the shooter.

  45. #44
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    2

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    I'll probably catch hell for saying this. But this is why I NEVER shoot handloads or reloads!

  46. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    1

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    First bubbaed and then boomed—a sad end to a great rifle.

    Glad the injuries were not bore serious.

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