How Many of You Glass- or Pillar-Bed?
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Thread: How Many of You Glass- or Pillar-Bed?

  1. #1
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    Default How Many of You Glass- or Pillar-Bed?

    I'm wondering how many of you guys either glass-bed or pillar-bed (with glass as well as the pillars) your hunting rifles. I'm not thinking solely of bedding for accuracy (where you'd free-float the barrel too), but also of bedding for increased protection against stock damage arising from recoil, particularly with heavier cartridges.
    Last edited by South Pender; 06-29-2020 at 02:29 PM.

  2. #2
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    Klinguther three point bedding is what I did frequently..
    float barrel Mostly depended on if the barrel worn in harmonics ...
    rifle May need pressure tipped So many pounds ..
    to simulate the barrel supportIveness as it was broken in all those years of shooting...!
    "Christís Grace + being constitutionally solvent !"

  3. #3
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    Dan, how did the Kleinguenther three-point bedding work? Did this include a pad at the forend tip?

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  5. #4
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    klingunther 3 point piller bedding
    https://youtu.be/AEyB9USP-cw
    this is two point...using modern stuff...just add a pressure tip pad at end of stock....
    with some one hold you rifle down, cradled.
    I had a scale And pulling up on barrel till a bill would slip freely...
    look at scale record poundage ..shoot, analysis ..
    trim record that pad shoot till sweet spot is obtained..
    barrel damping harmonics match The needs.. the bullet weight, brand, for customer or myself..
    all about checks balance patients..
    Years at the range..observing old times teachers, mentors..worth there salt..​on actual targets..
    none I can do at my age nor would attempt..near 70.
    "Christís Grace + being constitutionally solvent !"

  6. #5
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    hello again,SP. my first experience in shooting Mauser style rifles was all with military versions. my early, bolt action, sporting rifles were North American mfg., Win. model 70's, Ruger M77s. more recently, i've been enamoured with the Husqvarnas, mostly Dan's fault, and also the earlier blued steel and wood stocked Tikka M55s and M65s. the M55s usually shoot very accurately, just as from the factory. the M65s also shoot fine, until the stock cracks or breaks. i have been watching the Husqvarna 1900s for a few years now, and now own some. they do not seem prone to cracking the wood stocks. the 1600 series Husqvarnas are prone to cracking, particularly at the tang, so i have had two or three of them glass bedded in hopes of preventing a crack at the tang, and also at the recoil lug area.

    the Tikka m55s never seem to crack. the lighter recoil from smaller cartridges, and the single row/stack magazine are the cause/effect, i guess. the M65s with the large double row magazines, and recoil from the larger magnum cartridges are the opposite. lots have cracked stocks. the milsurp Mausers built on the 1898 action all have the steel crossbolt thru the stock, at the recoil lug, and stand up well, to heavy usage and lots of shooting. some of the Husqvarna small rings have the brass pins thru the stock at the trigger web area, and also at the recoil lug. some have the pins, some don't. the one's that don't definitely need improved bedding. the older the wood gets, and the more shooting that occurs, the more prone the stock is to splitting/cracking.

  7. #6
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    That makes sense, Frosty. With the rifles you've had glass-bedded for protection against recoil, have you also free-floated the barrels, or have you done what Dan was describing--putting a glass pad at the forend tip (presumably to damp vibrations)?

  8. #7
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    I’ve got the feeling:it’s my fault I talk people into these rifles locally..
    They never heard of one..keepers!

    yes the tighter fitting Area in the tang..
    With normal wood shrinkages in recoil areas,
    with compression, drying or oil soaking of cell wood In same areas..
    ...at times unchecked losing action screws..going from hot dry houses to hunting wet fields..
    transfer recoils into the open shrinkage areas, splitting trigger webs, wedged by magazine’s protruding points..

    as all gives in mag ares that spread Outward on recoil..left to right
    shorting Woods length while driving Recoil Of steel tang,
    now touching wood tang...to chip, lift, wedge, or split this dry thin area of wood.

    i was very selective early on..paying premiums on conditions..only ended up with one split 3,000..!
    the grain line hide, was the split..Trigger web was not split?
    i standard Glassed Beaded it, sighted it in checking it’s accuracy...
    sold it when I got another one....it cut holes!
    "Christís Grace + being constitutionally solvent !"

  9. #8
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    Cool

    And different shapes of the two actions tangs 1640vs1900 makes the 1900 less prone.
    "Christís Grace + being constitutionally solvent !"

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