Sporterized 98k
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Thread: Sporterized 98k

  1. #1
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    Default Sporterized 98k

    I have the chance to purchase a sporterized 98k for a great price, and I’m thinking of obtaining it for the purpose of bringing it back to its original form. The only thing I would need to do is to purchase an original stock, barrel bands, stock spring, and original sight. This a no brainer since the price is so low and the serial numbers on the receiver and bolt match. My question is, does the front sight have to be removed to install a rear sight, and if so, how much of a hassle is it?

  2. #2
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    most of the rear site mounting bands will pass over the front site. if you think you can find a correct original stock for a reasonable price, then perhaps you may proceed happily with the process. BUT, most of the K98k stocks of WW2 German mfg, are becoming very pricey items. i just saw one on the trader here, this evening, with an asking price of $450 or $475. it has been sanded fairly hard, so not very interesting for me. for a fun shooter, a sanded stock is ok, if you don't mind paying $300 to $450.

  3. #3
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    The rear sight base on a K98 will not fit over the front sight base. To install one you will need to unsolder the front base first.

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  5. #4
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    wink2

    I've gone thru this and its a money pit. At the end, collectors here would offer me half what the restored rifle cost me. I'd have been better (and cheaper) off just buying a K98k that was righteous and totally intact & correct.

    Do the math on parts (and know who actually has the parts), and then decide if the project is worth the effort.

    Of course if its a matter of "I want to" , then math & cost are not relevant and off you go down the road
    Last edited by milprileb; 06-30-2020 at 07:15 AM.

  6. #5
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    It's cool to restore a rifle to it's military configuration. So it's not about the money, it's a hobby and these cost often money. So it's not only the end result that counts, the way to it is also important. When you enjoy it, it's priceless.

    The mid war rear sight base cost like $40+sh, I might get stock sets again for about $200+39sh, have mid war band sets for about $100. Sight hood for about $20 and a correct cleaning rod for $99 (rod is a maybe, a lot of them sold in the past week).

    Best regards Tommy
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    I am an international Gunboards patron

  7. #6
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    smile

    Quote Originally Posted by US1945 View Post
    It's cool to restore a rifle to it's military configuration. So it's not about the money, it's a hobby and these cost often money. So it's not only the end result that counts, the way to it is also important. When you enjoy it, it's priceless.

    The mid war rear sight base cost like $40+sh, I might get stock sets again for about $200+39sh, have mid war band sets for about $100. Sight hood for about $20 and a correct cleaning rod for $99 (rod is a maybe, a lot of them sold in the past week).

    Best regards Tommy
    [email protected]
    Tommy...like I said if its a matter of "I want to" then enjoy the ride.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by argylemike View Post
    I have the chance to purchase a sporterized 98k for a great price, and I’m thinking of obtaining it for the purpose of bringing it back to its original form. The only thing I would need to do is to purchase an original stock, barrel bands, stock spring, and original sight. This a no brainer since the price is so low and the serial numbers on the receiver and bolt match. My question is, does the front sight have to be removed to install a rear sight, and if so, how much of a hassle is it?


    How cheap is "a great price"? Drilled and tapped for scope? A common code K98k, or something less common? I assume it's the original barrel and not a sporter replacement? Even if so, I would tend to agree with the others here that it will probably cost more to do than the finished result is worth. The matching bolt and receiver are nice, but in the end it will be a mismatched parts gun. If money is no issue, do it for fun!

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by argylemike View Post
    I have the chance to purchase a sporterized 98k for a great price, and I’m thinking of obtaining it for the purpose of bringing it back to its original form. The only thing I would need to do is to purchase an original stock, barrel bands, stock spring, and original sight. This a no brainer since the price is so low and the serial numbers on the receiver and bolt match. My question is, does the front sight have to be removed to install a rear sight, and if so, how much of a hassle is it?
    Sounds like a fun project. Done it myself a few times.
    When you switch sights, remember there's screws that locate them on the barrel.
    Post pics

  10. #9
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    I've done it, in the end its worth it even if it's expensive. You actually learn a lot about 98k's by doing such a project, looking for correct parts etc. - it makes you study and turns you into a collector, so be aware of that.
    Visit my site - www.latewar.com
    Check out the forum dedicated to the next volumes about the Kar98k rifle www.k98kforum.com

  11. #10
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    Thanks for the great responses on my inquiry. I’m not thinking of diving into a project just to have a 98k since I own a half dozen now in great condition. I believe this one can be rescued from Bubba who may grab it at a later date. It’s a 660 code 1940 gun in great shape other a than a cheap sporterization. It would only be a project gun and a shooter. If I’m careful, I believe I can restore it without spending a fortune.

  12. #11
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    The rifle i believe is Austrian instead of German. Everything the other members have told you are true. I have been down this path with several rifles. Research will have to be done to insure what you are buying is correct to your rifle. K-98 parts are difficult to find and when you do they are rather pricey. I have been lucky and ran across some at a flea markets at a steal, but that does not happen often. It is far easier to locate a sporterized rifle than the parts to fix it. While this rifle is worthy of restoration the cost will be more than you could sell it for. Sorry for the negative comments, just been there done that. Good luck with the project.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by seeker55 View Post
    The rifle i believe is Austrian instead of German. Everything the other members have told you are true. I have been down this path with several rifles. Research will have to be done to insure what you are buying is correct to your rifle. K-98 parts are difficult to find and when you do they are rather pricey. I have been lucky and ran across some at a flea markets at a steal, but that does not happen often. It is far easier to locate a sporterized rifle than the parts to fix it. While this rifle is worthy of restoration the cost will be more than you could sell it for. Sorry for the negative comments, just been there done that. Good luck with the project.


    The 660 code is indeed for Steyr in Austria, but in any case it is a German K98k made by Steyr under German control for the German military.

  14. #13
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    I applaud your idea of a project gun and a shooter--there was an article in an early 90s Gun Digest (the big annual one) by Jim Thompson (the M1 Garand author/guy). In it he talks about the several Mauser milsurps he put together from various countries parts to make "desert wanderer" guns/shooters. Motivated me to do the same. While nice German stocks are not as available/cheap as 25-30 years ago, a nice Spanish Mauser stock, for instance, gives you a shooter/plaything for little $$ and you have saved a nice rifle for posterity.

    Personally, I enjoy slightly-Bubba'd milsurps that maintain their military flavor. Lets me enjoy some guns that I could not otherwise afford--Good Luck whatever u decide!
    "I have never seen a situation so desperate the arrival of a policeman did not make worse"
    Brendan Behan, Irish poet

  15. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrfarb View Post
    I've done it, in the end its worth it even if it's expensive. You actually learn a lot about 98k's by doing such a project, looking for correct parts etc. - it makes you study and turns you into a collector, so be aware of that.

    ... and that is how I came by my chronic condition...
    I am the grass. Let me work.

  16. #15
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    Talk about a chronic condition.....I started fifty years ago and have not let up. Yeah, I’m one of those guys that was buying inexpensive guns out of a barrel, and enjoyed the tremendous influx of milsurp into the country in the 80’s
    And 90’s, and hated I started just after the 1968 Gun Control Act. I made up for it thanks to Reagan. It was a great way to collect as a poor college student and later on a cop’s salary. Today’s import (Ethiopia) prices are insane considering the conditions. Hard for a young new collector to get started in the hobby...

  17. #16
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    Screws in Front sight block..
    Under sightblade, very small, held sleeve solder. Tricky removal.
    Rear sight screw also locks ramp/ spring in place, also soldered.

    Good luck,
    Doc AV.

  18. #17
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    Just hope the dickhead who sporterized it did so in the 60s when these treasured guns weren't worth much. So sick of reading of sanded stocks and for what??!! Some just can't leave well enough alone.

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