Advice on GHS M1 stock....
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Thread: Advice on GHS M1 stock....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    western NY
    Posts
    37

    Default Advice on GHS M1 stock....

    Hello everyone,


    Recently had a chance to pick up a GHS cartouched stock which is correct for my 393XXX mixmaster M1. I believe it to be real because it has the correct shape clip latch cutout, a number stamped in the barrel channel, and is pretty worn, having been sanded enough that the crossed cannons SA cartouche is almost unrecognizable. I'm a relative newbie to the world of Garand collecting, but I believe someone added some sort of clearcoat varnish material to this stock years ago, which is now patchy from wear. It just seems too shiny and 'wet' looking to be built up dried BLO or BTO, but I could be wrong. My "RIA EB" cartouched stock that is on my M1 now has a similar "Springfield red" color to it and is very smooth from years of handling, but is nowhere near as shiny.

    My main concern now is that I wand to clean up this stock without degrading even more already sanded down cartouches. I've read through the CMP wood care article a few times and I would like to avoid using wood stripper on this stock if possible. The less invasive whatever I do to it is, the less chance of f-ing it up I have.

    I want to preserve the color and the cartouche, but get some of the crap like the white chalk and duct tape residue off and also taking some of the 'shine' away. I'd like it to wear a rubbed BLO finish as would have been done in service. The wood also seems to be very dry in areas where the shiny finish is wearing and my hope is the the BLO will return some 'depth' to the grain in these areas.


    Could someone please tell me what kind of finish they think may have been applied to this stock?

    If I were to rub it down with BLO and cheesecloth, a treatment the CMP wood care article recommends for 'freshening up' and cleaning old wood, does anyone know if the solvents and driers in the BLO would break down the duct tape residue and/or the shiny finish with the appropriate amount of time and rubbing?

    Anyone have any general thoughts on how I should proceed, or if I should at all?


    (examples of the 'shininess' best in first and last photos, 'patchiness' best in the pics of side of magazine/cartouche area pics)


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    2,074

    Default

    That is a valueable stock, If you are not familiar with working on them I would suggest sending it to Rick Borecky to clean/refinish

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    714

    Default

    +1 Rick does great Work......

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  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    480

    Default

    I'd start with a rag and some denatured alcohol.

    Mike

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    western NY
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Thanks for the input everybody.


    I was thinking as I was writing this post that this might be something I should leave to someone with lots of experience. Anyone have Rick Borecky's contact info? All I can find are some old posts on the CMP forums. Feel free to PM me if you don't think he wants it posted publicly.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 1969
    Posts
    1,364

    Default

    Rick does excellent work, he is in Ohio. His email address: [email protected]

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Posts
    714

    Default

    I think you are choosing the correct route. This is not an easy stock to come by. Let us know how it goes....

  9. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2019
    Location
    western NY
    Posts
    37

    Default

    Re: ITWORKED OUT,

    Yes, I feel very lucky to have gotten it at all, especially for the price. I think somebody really messed up labeling the auction; they didn't put "M1" or "Garand" anywhere in the title.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    2

    Default

    I have restored M1 and M1 carbine stocks using the following method. Mix trisodium phosphate (TSP) with water and heat it till it's hot (just boils if you have a small tank). Since I didn't have such a tank, I used a bath tub and dumped TSP in (about a hand full) and filled it with hot water (works but wife won't be happy), enough to cover the stock and then some. Wear rubber gloves. Use a bristle brush (hard to describe here but with medium bristles), a tooth brush, etc. and brush the stock. You will be surprised at how much old oil and gunk comes out. It will also remove paint. Drain the water and do it again until the water is nearly clear or you're happy with it. If you have a small tank that you can heat, you won't have to empty it (best way) and all the oil will be driven out. The tub method will remove small dings but will leave the cartouches intact. Then hand rub refined linseed oil into the stock. Repeat until the wood no longer absorbs the oil or until you're happy with it. BTW, refined linseed oil is raw linseed oil (original arsenal finish) with "with the free fatty acids, gums, and other extraneous materials removed" making it much easier and for my money better to use than raw. Good luck!

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