Oiler Oil?
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Thread: Oiler Oil?

  1. #1
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    Default Oiler Oil?

    I recently picked up a 1917-dated Enfield No1 MkIII* that was completely refurbished at Lithgow in '46, including a brand new barrel. (It should be a great shooter!) I've ordered a sling, oiler and pull-thru from Australia, but that got me thinking. I've seen a ton of posts regarding what type of oil was used on the stocks, but what type of oil was kept in the buttstock oiler for lubrication?
    William Russ
    Former President and Director, North Florida Arms Collectors Association

    "Going to war without France is like going hunting without an accordion."
    - General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr.

  2. #2
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    None!
    It was usually something called AquOil, which is a mix of a cleaner called "Youngs .303" in Civvy life, the military had a different designation for it, & water.
    It was used with the pull through & a patch for corrosive cleaning.


    I still have a "poink, poink" oil can!
    “Americans talk a lot about the value of freedom, but are actually afraid of anyone who truly exhibits it”.
    : Billy (The kid / Dennis Hopper).

  3. #3
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    You the man..learning..
    "Christ’s Grace + being constitutionally solvently Give strength resistant To Marxism!

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  5. #4
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    Wow! Now THAT is interesting! I just always assumed that it would be something like a thin motor oil or machine oil, etc, but the AquOil really makes sense for cleanup of corrosive salts. Just for the heck of it, I found that it can still be purchased from the UK, too, with only $30 shipping to the US!

    I really appreciate the history lesson! Thanks!
    William Russ
    Former President and Director, North Florida Arms Collectors Association

    "Going to war without France is like going hunting without an accordion."
    - General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr.

  6. #5
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    Address?
    "Christ’s Grace + being constitutionally solvently Give strength resistant To Marxism!

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by DK PHILLIPS View Post
    Address?
    I found it (albeit in new bottles) on ebay. I just searched for "Young's 303". It's in a red can from Parker Hale now, but still has Young's signature on it.
    William Russ
    Former President and Director, North Florida Arms Collectors Association

    "Going to war without France is like going hunting without an accordion."
    - General H. Norman Schwarzkopf, Jr.

  8. #7
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    Its more a cleaner than a lube.
    In all honesty we used the drips from a dipstick to dispense oil if needed!
    My A.J. Parker "poink, poink" can!

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    I'm not sure if it still is, but a while back "The Old Western Scrounger" had Young's .303 repackaged as "S.T.E.S." (Slicker Than Eel Sweat) lube & cleaner.
    https://www.ows-ammo.com/military-surplus?p=2
    Last edited by plonker; 07-07-2020 at 11:20 AM.
    “Americans talk a lot about the value of freedom, but are actually afraid of anyone who truly exhibits it”.
    : Billy (The kid / Dennis Hopper).

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by plonker View Post
    Its more a cleaner than a lube.
    In all honesty we used the drips from a dipstick to dispense oil if needed!
    My A.J. Parker "poink, poink" can!

    Click image for larger version. 

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Views:	2 
Size:	246.9 KB 
ID:	3685973

    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	3685975
    Customized butt trap storage compartment........Yes??
    Cheer’s.

  10. #9
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    In the olden days it was said they used sperm oil. For lubrication purposes.
    The corrosive salts were flushed out using water and 'the funnel'.

  11. #10
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    Yes but whale oil was getting hard to harvest & expensive. It was also much liked by watchmakers.
    You'd "boil out" (with the funnel, jug & boiling water)
    Then "Pull Through" with the cord & patches.(3 wet followed by 3 dry) the aquaoil went on the "wet" patches of 4X2.

    I've often wondered if the Tommy's constant "brewing up" wasn't as much about "boiling out & pulling through" as it was about making "Tiffin"!
    “Americans talk a lot about the value of freedom, but are actually afraid of anyone who truly exhibits it”.
    : Billy (The kid / Dennis Hopper).

  12. #11
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    This is not a lubricant for military use, especially as it forms an amalgam with rainwater which is definitely not what you want oil doing. Oil 'A' is the not very helpful description in A.C.I. 1356/40, with M.80 oil as an alternate. In later years OX-18 was the normal lubricant with some cleaning properties.

  13. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mk VII View Post
    This is not a lubricant for military use, especially as it forms an amalgam with rainwater which is definitely not what you want oil doing. Oil 'A' is the not very helpful description in A.C.I. 1356/40, with M.80 oil as an alternate. In later years OX-18 was the normal lubricant with some cleaning properties.
    I don't think I ever said it was?
    You'd "boil out" (with the funnel, jug & boiling water)
    Then "Pull Through" with the cord & patches.(3 wet followed by 3 dry) the aquaoil went on the "wet" patches of 4X2.
    But followed by:
    Its more a cleaner than a lube.
    In all honesty we used the drips from a dipstick to dispense oil if needed!
    “Americans talk a lot about the value of freedom, but are actually afraid of anyone who truly exhibits it”.
    : Billy (The kid / Dennis Hopper).

  14. #13
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    If you take a close look at the dipper fixed to the lid of an oiler bottle, you might notice that it is actually a little spoon for scooping. That is because the oiler was originally designed to hold petroleum jelly, ie vaseline.

    It was prescribed in Victorian times that the petroleum jelly was to be used generally as a rust inhibiter on all metal and that Rangoon oil was to be used for lubrication of moving parts.

    Rangoon oil, as the name implies came from Rangoon, Burma. Mineral oil, brownish colour, I have only sniffed at the old stuff, it stinks.

    Rangoon oil was replaced by a lubricating oil, general purpose.

    I have opened brass oiler bottles that were found with a metal detector and dug up out of the ground. All corroded on the outside but most still had nice oil in them.
    .
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    Look to your front, mark your target when it comes!
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  15. #14
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    Default Lubricating oil "G.S." aka M/80

    “Instructions for Armourers, 30 September 1931” has this to say:

    Section 2.—Cleaning and Lubricating of Rifles in use, and the Clearing of Obstructions from the Bore

    Note.—The lubricating oil referred to in this section, and elsewhere as “G.S.,” is termed M/80 in the V.A.O.S.

    1. The rifles are to be kept in a clean condition, special attention being given to the interior of the barrel and the breech action. Instructions for the care and cleaning of rifles by troops are contained in Small Arms Training, Vol. I, 1924, Chapter II Sections 38-40. Armourers should make themselves thoroughly acquainted with these instructions in addition to the instructions given hereunder.

    2. Oil, lubricating, G.S., only is to be used for cleaning the action; the use of abrasive substances, such as emery and emery cloth, is forbidden.

    3. To prevent water soaking into the stock, and at the same time to give the latter a polished appearance, it should be well rubbed with oil. French polish or varnish is on no account to be used. Red mineral jelly should be applied between stock, handguards, barrel and body as a protection against rust. At stations abroad, a mixture of two parts mineral jelly to one of beeswax will be employed.

    4. To clean the bore of .303-inch barrels:—
    (i) Oil, lubricating, G.S., only is to be used, but mineral burning oil (paraffin) can be mixed with it, as necessary, when cleaning with brass wire and with jute and emery, as detailed below.

    (ii) To clean a slightly rusty barrel with the double pull through, remove the bolt and nose-cap, drop the pull-through weight through the barrel from the breech, clamp the muzzle guide on the muzzle of the barrel to prevent damage by the friction of the cord, well oil the gauze wire, and, with the necessary assistance, pull the gauze wire to and fro until the rust is removed. Care must be taken to draw the pull-through out of the barrel in line with the bore, as friction between the pull-through cord and the wall of the chamber at the breech will cause the chamber to become oval and thus render the barrel unserviceable. When, in consequence of frequent use, the gauze wire ceases to fit the barrel tightly, narrow strips of the gauze, about -inch wide, or flannelette or paper, may be inserted under each side to increase its diameter.

    (iii)To clean rusty barrels with brass wire, emery and jute, fill the eye of the No. 4 rod with from 50 to 60 strands of the hard brass wire, No. 26 W.G., supplied in 3-inch lengths, and press the ends-well back along the rod. The rifles must then be held in a vice, and, after the nose cap has been removed, the wire, well oiled with a mixture of two parts of “Oil, lubricating, G.S.,” to one part of paraffin oil, is inserted in the muzzle end of the barrel; the muzzle guide * is then clamped on the muzzle and the rod worked up and down the bore to remove the rust. When a barrel is very rusty, it will found easier to loosen the rust by plugging the muzzle of the barrel, pouring in paraffin oil from the breech end, and leaving it there for a few hours. After loosening the rust, wipe out the barrel with jute inserted in the No. 1 rod and examine (the jute should be cut in lengths of about 8 inches). If a barrel is found to require further cleaning, coil the jute round so that it fits the bore tightly, sprinkle on a little flour emery, replace it in the barrel, and after clamping on the muzzle guide, work the rod well up and down until the barrel is clean. A slightly pitted surface will usually remain; this should be oiled with “Oil, lubricating, G.S.” To preserve the wire on the No. 4 rod when not in use, a cartridge case cut short at the shoulder will be found useful as a cap. The length of the No.4 rod is such as will ensure that the wire will not pass beyond the front end of the chamber and become jammed. The No. 1 rod, for jute, is of a suitable length to pass through the barrel from the breech end.

    (iv) When rifles are received from store, and the bore of the barrel is thickly coated with mineral jelly, the latter must be removed and the bore lightly oiled with G.S. oil before the rifles are issued to troops.

    * When a muzzle guide becomes badly worn in the cleaning rod guide bole, and no longer protects the bore of the barrel, it should be exchanged.

    5. To clean the chamber of .303-inch barrels:—
    Use only a piece of gauze wire, or a piece of oiled flannelette, necessary, in the chamber cleaning stick. Care must be taken not to enlarge or damage the chamber by the use of unauthorized materials. A bright chamber is not to be insisted upon.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  16. #15
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    The lubricating oil referred to in this section, and elsewhere as “G.S.,” is termed M/80 in the V.A.O.S.
    Might that be the military designation for "Youngs"? I don't know, or remember it, but I do recall it was never known as "Youngs" in service.
    “Americans talk a lot about the value of freedom, but are actually afraid of anyone who truly exhibits it”.
    : Billy (The kid / Dennis Hopper).

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